Foster City ex-mayor eyes seat on Planning Commission

Even after 13 years of service to Foster City, former Mayor Ron Cox says he isn’t ready to end his city career just yet.

After finishing his second full term as a council member, Cox turned in his application papers seeking an appointment to the Foster City Planning Commission, a post he held for five years between 1995 and 1999.

“It would be exciting to work with him again, and he will go through the process like anyone else, but it will be exciting if he gets appointed to the Planning Commission,” recently re-elected Councilmember Linda Koelling said.

Cox — who owns a construction company — said that while he enjoyed the policymaking and discussions of the council, he’s excited to get back to the plans and projects that the Planning Commission deals with.

“The building and the designs are more exciting to me than sitting down and looking at the numbers and leases and business deals,” Cox said.

If elected, Cox would join the rest of the commission as an advisor to the City Council on planning issues as well as hold study sessions and preliminary hearings on projects, such as the redevelopment of the 15 acres south of City Hall and the continued work on the Pilgrim-Triton and Chess-Hatch projects.

Koelling likened Cox to Councilmember Rick Wykoff, who spent 17 years as Foster City’s city manager before joining the council in 2001.

Like Koelling, Wykoff was re-elected this year to serve his second full four-year term on the dais.

“They both have a lot of experience and wisdom and are professional, so it’s an excellent prospect if it occurs,” she said.

If appointed by the council to the Planning Commission, Cox said he will continue avoiding taking on any construction projects in Foster City, to evade potential conflicts of interest.

And although he would be eligible for another shot at the council in two years, Cox said that barring any major problems on the council — which he does not see happening — he won’t run again for a council seat.

jgoldman@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocalPeninsula

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