Foster City council gingerly steps into empty lot

For more than two months, the City Council has collected public input and discussed the future of the 15-acre site just south of the civic center, and while Monday is the next opportunity to select a developer, council members are unsure whether they’re ready for a decision yet.

“Nobody on the council wants to rush this,” Mayor Ron Cox said. “We’re all being cautious because this is the last piece of property there, so it’s something that everyone on the council thinks very hard about.”

Council members on Monday will field public comments and possibly select a development partner to build mixed-use senior housing and retail, possibly with a theater, on 11 of the 15 acres. The remaining four acres will be developed into a charter high school after this process is complete.

“The decision is big enough for the city, and public feedback is important enough that the council is moving in a pretty slow and deliberative way to avoid setting an arbitrary date,” Community Development Director Richard Marks said.

Since an April 30 meeting at which development teams presented their plans, the council has toured project sites around the Bay Area and collected public input at meetings.

While the council will decide between one of three proposals, council members said they may end up trying to mix and match aspects of each proposal.

Each of the potential developers is a partnership between various firms. One group is comprised of Pacific Retirement Services Inc., the Jewish Home of San Francisco and Sares Regis Group of Northern California. The second is Bridge Housing, Pacific Union Development Company and Retail West, while the final group is a partnership between A.F. Evans Company and Crosspoint Realty Services.

The meeting is Monday at 7:30 p.m. in City Council Chambers, 620 Foster City Blvd.

jgoldman@examiner.com


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