Former mayor, developer to debate future of quarry site

The first debate of the election season in Pacifica will not include any of the seven candidates running for City Council seats.

Instead, R. Don Peebles, the property owner and developer hoping to bring mixed-use rights to 83 acres of the Rockaway Quarry, and Peter Loeb, who served two years as Pacifica’s mayor during his tenure on the council from 1982-1990, will square off in a debate on the ballot initiative facing the coastside town.

On Nov. 7, voters will not only choose three City Council members but also vote on whether to allow residential development in the quarry.

A 1983 city ordinance requires any development proposal changing the zoning to allow residential building in the quarry to go to ballot. In 2002, voters rejected a proposal from developer Trammel Crow for 315 residential units and mixed-use development, voting 65 percent to 35 percent against the measure.

Peebles said he wants to build a “town center” with commercial, retail, restaurants, a small cinema, a town hall, a library, 355 housing units and a luxury resort hotel with 350 rooms. Forty-five percent of the parcel would be dedicated public open space, he added.

Frank Winston of the Pacifica/Coastside Democrats set up the debate — which will be formatted like a traditional debate, with time limits and rebuttals — and said the issue is whether there should be a proposal at all.

“I’m hoping that they’ll be able to convince the audience that either it’s a good thing to have a commercial and residential philanthropic use of his property or it’s a bad thing to have any development on the property,” Winston said.

Peebles said that with the way the property is currently zoned he could build 2 million square feet of commercial space without any input from voters, but it would be a “tremendous bang for the dollar” for the city if a mixed-use development were allowed.

“It’s not a question of ‘if,’ but a question of ‘what,’” Peebles said.

Loeb said his concerns had to do with the size of the project and the public’s confusion about what they’re voting on in November.

“The confusion that’s happening is some people have this belief they’re voting on a project that’s been talked about,” Loeb said.

The debate is set for Saturday at the Sharp Park Golf Course Restaurant at 9:30 a.m. Winston will moderate.

dsmith@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

A statue of Florence Nightingale outside the Laguna Honda Hospital is one of only two statues of women in The City. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
S.F. still falling short of goal to represent women in public art

City has few streets or public facilities not named after men

Methamphetamines (Sophia Valdes/SF Weekly)
New search launched for meth sobering center site

Pandemic put project on pause but gave health officials time to plan a better facility

Hasti Jafari Jozani quarantines at her brother's San Francisco home after obtaining several clearances to study at San Francisco State University. (Photo courtesy Siavash Jafari Jozani)
Sanctions, visas, and the pandemic: One Iranian student’s bumpy path to SF State

Changing immigration rules and travel restrictions leave some overseas students in limbo

Woody LaBounty, left, and David Gallagher started the Western Neighborhoods Project which has a Balboa Street office housing historical items and comprehensive website dedicated to the history of The City’s West side. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Outside Lands podcast delves into West side’s quirky past

History buffs Woody LaBounty and David Gallagher have been sharing fun stories about the Richmond and Sunset since 1998

Allison Zilnek and her younger daughter Marlow add Ibram X. Kendi’s “Antiracist Baby” to their Little Free Library in Walnut Creek. (Courtesy of Allison Zilnek)
The hunt for little free libraries is alleviating the pandemic doldrums

By Amelia Williams Bay City News Foundation Some people collect stamps. Some… Continue reading

Most Read