Former 49er Bruce Miller appears at San Francisco Superior Court on Friday, Sept. 9, 2016. (Jonah Owen Lamb/S.F. Examiner)

Former 49er Bruce Miller appears at San Francisco Superior Court on Friday, Sept. 9, 2016. (Jonah Owen Lamb/S.F. Examiner)

Former 49er Bruce Miller appears in court on assault charges

Former 49er Bruce Miller appeared in San Francisco Superior Court on Friday afternoon for his arraignment in an assault case stemming from an incident in Fisherman’s Wharf, which was put over to November.

Miller, 29, was arrested in San Francisco on Monday morning after getting into a brawl with an elderly man and his son in a Fisherman’s Wharf hotel. The 49ers announced shortly after his arrest that Miller was released from the team.

Miller, who was joined by two women, did not speak to reporters at the courthouse.

The San Francisco District Attorney’s Office announced Thursday that Miller has been charged with one felony count of assault with a deadly weapon, which in this case was a cane; one felony count assault with force likely to cause great bodily injury; one count felony inflicting injury on an elder to cause great bodily injury; one count felony battery; two counts felony criminal threats; one count felony assault with force likely to cause great bodily injury and one county misdemeanor battery. The charges also include enhancements.

Miller allegedly attempted to enter a hotel room that was not his while he was drunk. When he was confronted by the occupant, a 70-year-old man, he assaulted the man and then charged his 29-year-old son.

Miller bailed out of County Jail earlier this week on a $178,000 bond. A protective order was issued in the case Friday, and Miller’s arraignment was postponed to Nov. 2.

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Read more criminal justice news on the Crime Ink page in print. Follow us on Twitter: @sfcrimeink49ersAssaultBruce MillerCrimeFisherman's WharfNFLSan Francisco Superior CourtSFPD

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