Special camouflage-patterned Lyft cars will be made available to high-ranking military officials at Fleet Fest. (Connor Hunt//Special to S.F. Examiner)

Special camouflage-patterned Lyft cars will be made available to high-ranking military officials at Fleet Fest. (Connor Hunt//Special to S.F. Examiner)

Fleet Week, Lyft to launch ‘Fleet Fest’

Despite San Francisco’s reputation as a home for peaceniks and hippies, the roar of jets at Fleet Week is a tradition here as well-known as the fog.

For 35 years, onlookers have gathered at the Marina Green and throughout The City to see a parade of naval battleships, planes and of course — the Blue Angels.

But now the old-school military pageantry is gaining a new tech twist, as Fleet Week partners with Lyft to produce the brand new “Fleet Fest.”

Garth Langley, a spokesman for SF Fleet Week, told the San Francisco Examiner they’re hoping to make Fleet Week appeal to The City’s longtime locals, as well as its new tech residents.

“We see the changing landscape in San Francisco being interested in Fleet Week,” he said.

Fleet Fest is a first-ever Fleet Week food truck festival with live music at Pier 80, which will run Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Fleet Week is also partnering with Off the Grid, who are bringing Bacon Bacon, Taco Guys and a number of other truck-laden food favorites to the event.

Lyft is also inviting its drivers, who are military veterans, to enjoy free food, drinks and a special event at Fleet Fest to gather and talk shop, Lyft Chief Marketing Officer Kira Scherer Wampler told the Examiner.

High-ranking military officials will be offered rides in a specially painted camouflage-patterned Lyft van.

For all the pageantry, the heart of the partnership is Lyft’s effort to manage congestion at local events, Wampler said, much like they’ve done at sponsored San Francisco Giants games, the San Francisco Pride Parade and the multiday concert Outside Lands.

“Think about trying to park at Outside Lands,” Wampler said. These new efforts are part partnership, and part road engineering.

The need is great, she said, “We’re looking at some of the data from last year, and we had as many riders with Fleet Week as with Hardly Strictly Bluegrass.”

There is a promo code for Fleet Week Lyft discounts, and a designated drop-off point at Pier 80 for Lyft cars. And for the Fleet Week events Lyft also will cap its Prime Time pricing (much like Uber’s “surge” pricing) at 200 percent, Wampler said.

And though the Surge and Prime Time pricing are both techniques these tech-ride apps promote as enticing more drivers to hit the road, Wampler said capping Prime Time hasn’t lessened the number of drivers.

“We’ve seen extremely strong response in terms of supply,” Wampler said. “For Outside Lands I believe we had fewer than 20 unavailable sessions at peak time.”

Still, even more than its promises to tackle congestion, Langley said the partnership with Lyft was key because of its commitment to veterans.

“Lyft has a very focused effort on hiring veterans, and we see a mutual benefit as we honor our active service members and veterans [at Fleet Week],” he said.

Transit

Just Posted

Dreamforce returned to San Francisco in person this week – but with a tiny sliver of past attendance. (Courtesy Salesforce)
Dreamforce returns with hundreds on hand, down from 170,000 in the past

High hopes for a larger Salesforce conference shriveled during the summer

The numbers show nearly 14 percent of San Francisco voters who participated in the Sept. 14 recall election wanted to oust Gov. Gavin Newsom from elected office. (Shutterstock photo)
(Shutterstock photo)
How San Francisco neighborhoods voted in the Newsom recall

Sunset tops the list as the area with the most ‘yes’ votes

Alison Collins says that she and other members of San Francisco Unified School District Board of Education facing potential recall “represent constituents that are often erased or talked over.” <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Alison Collins speaks: Embattled SF school board member confronts the recall effort

‘It’s important for folks to know what this recall is about. It’s bigger than any one of us.’

Is the Black Cat incident a distraction from the recovery of The City’s storied nightlife industry or does Mayor London Breed’s behavior inadvertently highlight the predicament the industry’s been in since San Francisco reinstated indoor mask requirements on Aug. 20?<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner, 2021)</ins>
Club owners to maskless mayor: Are we the new fun police?

Black Cat affair highlights difficult recovery for nightlife industry

BART’s Powell Street station in The City was the site of a fatal accident on Sept. 13.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Powell Station death serves as a grim reminder. BART doors don’t stop for anyone

What you need to know about safety sensors on the trains

Most Read