Raymond “Shrimp Boy” will stand trial for racketeering on Nov. 1. (courtesy photo)

Raymond “Shrimp Boy” will stand trial for racketeering on Nov. 1. (courtesy photo)

First witnesses take stand in Raymond ‘Shrimp Boy’ Chow trial

The first two witnesses in the the murder and racketeering trial of Raymond “Shrimp Boy” Chow testified late Monday and Tuesday morning about the killing of Chinatown businessman Allen Leung, whose death Chow allegedly ordered.

“This was not some random robbery,” said prosecutor Waqar Hasib Monday in Judge Charles Breyer’s federal courtroom. “In fact, there were several thousand dollars left at scene.”

After the 2006 killing, Chow took over the leadership of the Ghee Kung Tong, a Chinatown community group that Leung had headed. Chow and his lawyers deny he had any part in the killing. But federal prosecutors say Chow’s attire at Leung’s funeral — he wore a white suit — was a symbol of his disrespect.

The testimony from Monday afternoon and Tuesday centered on the incident itself.

Officer Rodney Lee, a retired San Francisco police officer, was the first on scene after Leung was shot several times inside his Jackson Street business, Wonkow Art Centres.

He said he found Leung’s “excited” wife not far from Leung’s body. “She was very upset and excited,” said Lee.

In his incident report, which he read aloud in court, a description of what Leung’s wife told him was retold.

“[The shooter] pulled a black ski mask over his face, black semi-automatic gun, and said ‘robbery’ in English,” said Lee of the report.

Leung told dispatchers and Lee that a Chinese man of medium build and height came in, yelled robbery, told her to get face down on the floor and then shot her husband several times. Then he fled.

But in his opening statement for Chow, Tony Serra said Leung’s death had nothing to do with his client.

Leung was a loan shark with a mistress who had enemies. One of those enemies, said Serra, was his wife Jenny Leung. “She is manifesting what is termed crocodile tears,” said Serra on Monday about the couple, who he said were estranged because of Leung’s mistress.

Serra said a man named Jack Lee was present during the incident. “Lee left for Hong Kong and never returned,” said Serra. “There was some collusion between wife Lee and the killer.”

No evidence of such collusion has been presented in court.

FBI agent William Wu was the second witness Monday, and he told of how Leung said that Chow wanted to come after him. His cross examination began Tuesday morning.

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