Fire officials recover more bodies from Oakland warehouse

Alameda County sheriff's officials set up a barrier outside the charred warehouse at 1305 31st Ave. in Oakland. (Jonah Owen Lamb/S.F. Examiner)

Alameda County sheriff's officials set up a barrier outside the charred warehouse at 1305 31st Ave. in Oakland. (Jonah Owen Lamb/S.F. Examiner)

Emergency officials late Sunday morning continued to recover more bodies from the charred wreckage of the Oakland warehouse fire that killed at least 24 people but declined to go into further detail.

“We are recovering more victims. We’re not going to get into the numbers,” Alameda County sheriff’s Sgt. Ray Kelly told reporters at an 11 a.m. news conference near the burned-out warehouse known as the “Ghost Ship” at 1305 31st Ave. in Oakland.

SEE RELATED: Authorities continue ‘heartbreaking’ search after Oakland blaze kills at least 24

The fire broke out at about 11:30 p.m. Friday at the warehouse that was being used by an artist collective and hosted the party with musical acts that night.

Just 20 percent of the building had been searched as of 8 a.m. Sunday, and Kelly said at the latest news conference that the process requires authorities to work in dangerous conditions, and every time they come upon another victim they have to conduct investigate steps.

SEE RELATED: Death toll rises to 24 in Oakland ‘Ghost Ship’ blaze

Federal agents were assisting with the search.

“One by one, piece by piece,” was how Kelly described the search for victims amid the wreckage, later adding, the “likelihood is not very good of survivability.”

SEE RELATED: How to help victims of Oakland fire

A Family Assistance Center has been set up at 2425 E. 12th St. where family and friends can go to find out information about loved ones, and people can also call the Alameda County coroner’s bureau at (510) 382-3000 for more information.

Authorities have not released the identity of any victims.

Kelly said some bodies were easier to identify because a wallet or other identification was found near them, but others will require DNA or dental records to confirm identities.

Meanwhile, the smell of smoke lingered in the Fruitvale neighborhood late Sunday morning, some 32 hours after the fire broke out.Bay Area NewsFatal fireoakland fire

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