Fire Department gets soaked

Fires aren’t the only things the San Francisco Fire Department has been fighting lately. The wild storm on Oct. 13 apparently caused a flood of water to soak the Department’s headquarters at Second Street and Townsend. Water damaged electrical wires and the carpet and made for quite a mess. All in all, the Department of Public Works performed $1,973.64 in repairs for the building, which included plumbing and electrical work as well as some major follow up work. It’s not exactly good news for the Fire Department, which is facing major budget cuts and already has a few stations slated for repair in a future bond measure, but once again, the Public Utilities Commission may come to the rescue. The PUC is already taking over some significant costs for maintaining the Auxiliary Water Supply System. Now, they may be paying the bill for the flooding at the department headquarters.

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