Fire at Habitat for Humanity construction site destroys home, damages 2 others

A three-alarm fire at a Habitat for Humanity Greater San Francisco construction site destroyed a home and damaged two others in San Francisco's Oceanview neighborhood late Friday night, an organization spokesperson said.

The blaze occurred around 11 p.m. Friday at the construction site on Capitol Avenue near Sagamore Street north of Interstate Highway 280, Habitat for Humanity spokeswoman Lindsay Riddell said.

Firefighters from the Fire Department's Station 33, located across the street from the construction site entrance, in addition to other units quickly responded to the blaze and contained it, Riddell said.

A home that was 90 percent framed was destroyed in the fire that damaged two adjacent homes, she said.

Crews were still assessing damage Saturday at the 28-unit Habitat Terrace development, according to Riddell.

The nonprofit had to cancel a work day for 100 volunteers at the site Saturday due to the fire, she said.

No injuries were reported and the cause of the fire is under investigation.

“The fire at Habitat Terrace is obviously disheartening but we are grateful it didn't spread beyond these three homes,” Habitat for Humanity Greater San Francisco CEO Phillip Kilbridge said in a statement.

“The community that helped us build these homes will be the community that returns to build them. This is yet another way Habitat provides inventive solutions to our area's expensive real estate challenges,” Kilbridge said.

The fire may impact the nonprofit's volunteer schedule in the next few weeks, according to Riddell.

The nonprofit will post updates on its website and contact volunteers by phone or email on whether build days will be rescheduled, she said.

Donations to help the nonprofit rebuild the damaged homes can be made online at https://www.habitatgsf.org/donate.

Bay Area NewsHabitat for HumanityOceanview neighborhood

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