Final fair for Bay Meadows

Before Bay Meadows closes its doors in two weeks, the historic racetrack will share the spotlight with Weird Al Yankovic, Billy Ray Cyrus and others during the upcoming San Mateo County Fair.

Bay Meadows, which stands next to the county Event Center in San Mateo, where the fair is held, will feature live horse racing through Aug. 17, excluding Monday and Tuesday, as part of the 74th annual fair, which begins today and also ends Aug. 17. The racetrack will then be razed to make way for a commercial development.

“This will be the last opportunity for people in the Bay Area to see live racing at Bay Meadows,” said fair spokeswoman Marie Franko.
Franko said organizers are working with the California Horse Racing Board to secure an off-site venue for future horse racing during fairs.

Organizers are expecting to surpass last year’s guest total of 142,000 people by featuring three stages for Bay Area acts plus a separate carnival area with rides.

The main stage will host a different performer each night starting at 7:30. Acts this year include comedian Yankovic, musicians KC & The Sunshine Band with the Village People, Cyrus and Tower of Power.

Local talent will also vie for $100,000 in cash and prizes during 8,000 exhibits in seven categories throughout the fair.

The fair will feature a kids’ day Monday, senior day Tuesday and Spanish heritage day Aug. 17. Special exhibits and entertainment will be available those days depending on the theme.

The fair will stay open until midnight on Fridays and Saturdays, and until 11 p.m. Sundays through Thursdays.

The fair will be $4 when it opens at 4 p.m. today and will open at noon each day afterward at $9 for adults and $7 for juniors and seniors. Rides costs extra, with an unlimited pass costing $30.

mrosenberg@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsBay MeadowsLocalSan Mateo County Fair

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