The Warriors' proposed arena in Mission Bay is located across the street from UCSF. (Images courtesy Manica Architecture; Images rendered by steelblue)

The Warriors' proposed arena in Mission Bay is located across the street from UCSF. (Images courtesy Manica Architecture; Images rendered by steelblue)

Final EIR certified for Warriors arena in Mission Bay

The proposed Warriors arena in Mission Bay has cleared another hurdle.

The Commission on Community Investment and Infrastructure on Tuesday unanimously certified the final environmental impact report for the project, paving the way for a slew of additional approvals slated in the coming weeks.

The nearly 5,000-page final EIR, released Oct. 23, includes $60 million in various improvements that city officials are confident will mitigate traffic impacts from the 18,000-seat arena.

The commission also approved plans for the development, including offices and open space, at an 11-acre site at Third and 16th streets in Mission Bay, across the street from UC San Francisco’s three new hospitals that opened in February.

Despite concerns from the Mission Bay Alliance group led by former UCSF officials who claim the arena will create detrimental traffic and noise in the area, the proposed arena last month month received support from the university after city officials agreed to numerous efforts aimed to relieve traffic congestion from the new arena.

“Even with the opposition stating their concerns that are always valid, I think [the] responses have been adequately made on the record,” said Mara Rosales, the commission’s chairperson, after the commission heard several hours of public comment Tuesday from supporters and opponents of the project.

Mayor Ed Lee noted the privately-financed project will generate a significant amount of jobs and revenue for The City.

“The Warriors will create a new legacy and inspire a new generation of fans when they return to San Francisco,” Lee said in a statement Tuesday. “Our Mission Bay is an incredible innovation ecosystem and a hub for technology, healthcare and more. But, it will not be complete until the Warriors return home to a brand new state-of-the-art event center.”

As part of the agreement with UCSF, Lee and the majority of supervisors proposed establishing a Mission Bay Transportation Fund that will pay for city services and capital improvements needed to accommodate the arena. Money in the fund will come from project-generated revenues, estimated at $14 million annually.

The final EIR spells out such efforts, including a first-of-its-kind Local/Hospital Access Plan to ensure patients, residents and businesses have access to Mission Bay and UCSF during events.

Plans to add parking control officers, purchase four new light-rail vehicles, improve the T-Third light-rail line and construct a center boarding platform at the stop near the arena to accommodate additional riders are also included in the final EIR.

John Caine, co-owner of the waterfront restaurant Hi Dive near AT&T Park, said he has seen firsthand traffic generated by events at the ballpark and is confident that similar congestion created by the Warriors arena will be mitigated.

“The Hi Dive is located at Bryant and the Embarcadero, and game day and event day traffic is a give-in,” Caine said. “The City does an outstanding job of managing the vehicle, pedestrian and other traffic.”Commission on Community Investment and InfrastructureEIRMayor Ed LeeMission BayMission Bay AllianceNBAOPlanningUCSFWarriorsWarriors arena

Just Posted

San Francisco Giants manager Gabe Kapler, pictured in July at Oracle Park, says team members simultaneously can be “measured and calm” and “looking to push the accelerator.” (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
How Gabe Kapler sets the tone for Giants’ success with strategy, mindset

‘There’s no doubt in my mind that he’s the hands-down manager of the year’

Artist Agnieszka Pilat, pictured with Spot the Robot Dog from Boston Robotics, has a gallery show opening at Modernism. (Courtesy Agnieszka Pilat)
Screenshots of VCs, Kanye and tech parties by the Bay

In this week’s roundup, Ben Horowitz’s surprising hip-hop knowledge and the chic tech crowd at Shack15

If he secured a full term in the Senate, Newsom would become the most powerful Californian Democrat since Phil Burton at the height of his career, or maybe ever. <ins>(Kevin Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Firefighters extinguish burning material near Lake Tahoe on Sept. 3 in the wake of the Caldor Fire; environmental scientists say the huge fire is bringing to light deficiencies in forest management. <ins>(Max Whittaker/New York Times)</ins>
Cal Fire, timber industry must face an inconvenient truth

We are logging further into the wildfire and climate crisis

Changing zoning in San Francisco neighborhoods where single family homes prevail is crucial in the effort to achieve equity. (Shutterstock)
To make SF livable, single-family zoning must be changed

Let’s move to create affordable housing for working class families

Most Read