Sandra Lee Fewer poses for a portrait outside City Hall in San Francisco, Calif. Monday, September 26, 2016. Fewer declared victory in the District 1 supervisor race on Monday. (Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner)

Sandra Lee Fewer poses for a portrait outside City Hall in San Francisco, Calif. Monday, September 26, 2016. Fewer declared victory in the District 1 supervisor race on Monday. (Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner)

Fewer appears to win District 1 supervisor race

Voters appear to have elected school board member Sandra Lee Fewer to the District 1 seat on the Board of Supervisors late Tuesday, ending one of the most expensive supervisor races in San Francisco’s history.

Fewer, a progressive, faced nine other candidates including moderate frontrunner Marjan Philhour, who benefited from more than $1 million in third-party spending and campaign contributions.

The candidates ran to end the Richmond’s neighborhood issues like out-of-sequence traffic lights, garbage pile-up and empty storefronts, but money dominated the conversation in the latter half of the race.

The race was one of three supervisorial races in which moderate candidates appeared to have a serious chance at replacing a progressive incumbent, possibly swinging the majority vote for citywide issues on the Board of Supervisors in their favor.

The other candidates were David Lee, Jonathan Lyens, Bryan Larkin, Andy Thornley, Sam Kwong, Richie Greenberg, Jason Jungreis and Sherman Dsilva.

Fewer, 59, has said she wants to retain existing affordable housing while also building it, curb rampant car break-ins and re-envision public transit for the Richmond beyond the long-delayed Geary Corridor Bus Rapid Transit project.

Fewer is a Richmond District resident of five decades whose husband is a retired San Francisco police officer.

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