Federal lawsuit dismissed over fatal police shooting at barbershop

A wrongful death lawsuit over the fatal shooting of a man who allegedly exchanged gunfire with police inside a crowded barbershop has been dismissed with both sides agreeing to bear their own costs, according to court records.

Attorneys for the family of 21-year-old Jehad Eid agreed to dismiss the lawsuit last month after accusing police of “excessive and unnecessary force” in the December 2018 lawsuit against the City and County of San Francisco.

The lawsuit alleged that officers Kevin Endo and Tess Casey “lacked reasonable cause to believe that [Eid] posed a risk to officers or others sufficient to justify that use of deadly force.”

Endo and Casey shot and killed Eid at the Amazon Barber Shop near Geneva Avenue and London Street on March 21, 2018. Based on body-camera footage, police later said Eid drew a gun and fired at the officers before being shot.

Meiling Bedard, a spokesperson for the City Attorney’s Office, called the shooting an “unfortunate incident” but said police “acted lawfully in responding to an active shooter posing an imminent danger to themselves and bystanders.”

“The suspect fired on officers, who had no choice but to engage with the suspect in order to prevent injury or death to bystanders,” Bedard said. “We hope that the dismissal of this lawsuit can bring closure for all involved.”

Dan Siegal, an attorney for the family, could not immediately be reached for comment. He previously told the San Francisco Examiner that Eid “was not a threat to anyone and they killed him.”

The officers were searching for Eid because he had allegedly threatened his family with a gun at a nearby residence.

One of the officers, Endo, was shot in the leg during the shootout, police said. Another four people were struck or grazed by gunfire.

In May 2019, the District Attorney’s Office under former District Attorney George Gascon declined to file charges against Endo or Casey, finding that the officers shot Eid in defense of themselves or others.

The shooting prompted another lawsuit against the City and County of San Francisco from two of the barbers who were seriously injured during the exchange of gunfire.

That lawsuit, from Ernest Dale Conway III and Eid Abdelwahhab, alleged that the officers acted negligently by confronting Eid in the crowded barbershop when he was known to be armed.

The second lawsuit is pending in San Francisco Superior Court.

mbarba@sfexaminer.com

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