Farmers market gets to stay at the Ferry Building

The thousands of people who like to buy their organic produce in the shade of the Ferry Building will not have to find a new home for their Saturday shopping after all.

BART announced Sunday that work to retrofit its Transbay tube, which runs underneath a pier where the Ferry Plaza Farmer’s Market sets up every weekend, will not force the market to move as initially thought.

BART, which is in the process of retrofitting the tube and the rest of its tracks across the Bay Area, believed it would have to shut down the market, after an initial study showed the soil under the market was soft and unless strengthened could cause the tube to shift during a major earthquake.

But a second more detailed study completed last week showed the soil was not as soft as initially thought, meaning BART can move its work several hundred feet east of the pier and not disturb the market.

There was a huge public outcry after BART first announced it would have to close the market, according to Lynette Sweet, the vice president of the BART Board of Directors.

She said BART worked with the vendors and the community to find a way to keep the popular market in place.

“(This study) means that the market and its 40,000 customers can stay put,” she said. “As we’ve proven with the farmers market, BART always tries to go the extra mile to accommodate the community.”

Dave Stockdale, of the Center for Urban Education About Sustainable Agriculture, the organization that runs the market, said they never looked for alternative sites to host the market because the 120 vendors were confident a solution would be found to keep them at the Ferry Building.

“We have been looking at options all the way through on the basis that we would be here,” he said. “We’re appreciative that (BART) did thorough engineering studies and examined all possibilities.”

BART plans to begin retrofitting the San Francisco side of the Transbay tube in the middle of 2008 and it will take about two years to complete at a cost of $300 million, according to BART Board of Director James Fang. He said the agency plans to use $1.3 billion from a bond measure to retrofit all its lines. BART riders are not expected to experience any fee increases or service disruptions during construction, Sweet said.

sfarooq@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Dr. Grant Colfax, director of the San Francisco Department of Public Health. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SF moves into purple tier, triggering curfew and business shutdowns

San Francisco moved into the state’s purple COVID-19 tier Saturday, requiring The… Continue reading

San Francisco lacks housing data that would let it track rental vacancies and prices. New legislation is seeking to change that.<ins> (Photo by Joel Angel Jurez/2016 Special to S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Landlords blast proposal to require annual report on rentals as invasion of privacy

Housing inventory could give city better data on housing vacancies, affordability

University of San Francisco head coach Todd Golden coaches his team on defense during a 2019 gameat War Memorial Gymnasium on the campus of the University of San Francisco. (Ryan Gorcey / S.F. Examiner)
Stunner in Bubbleville: USF upsets fourth-ranked Virginia

Less than 48 hours removed from a loss to a feeble UMass… Continue reading

Health care workers would be the first group in the state to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. (Go Nakamura/Getty Images/TNS)
Hope on the way: Here’s what to know about California’s COVID-19 vaccine plan

The first batch of doses could hit the state as soon as early December

The Big Game was played Friday at Memorial Stadium in Berkeley. (Shutterstock)
Stanford blocks extra point to stun Cal, win 123rd Big Game 24-23

The 123rd edition of the Big Game featured a number of firsts.… Continue reading

Most Read