Fans stand around a large puddle while watching Hinds perform at the Tunnel Stage during the second day of the 10th annual Treasure Island Music Festival. (Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner)

Fans disappointed after wet and windy Treasure Island Music Festival

The 10th annual Treasure Island Music Festival last weekend offered a lineup of big names like Ice Cube, Sigur Ros, James Blake and Glass Animals, but quickly it became clear that the wet and windy weather was the real show-stealer.

Wind and rain created harsh conditions for festival-goers this year. Compounded by canceled and delayed sets, muddy puddles and no parking allowed on Treasure Island, many attendees left damp and disappointed.

On Saturday morning, a gust of wind on the pier took down a wall from a tent and blew it into a charging station, injuring an employee of the festival, according to Alan Scott, executive vice president of Another Planet Entertainment, which hosted the festival along with Noise Pop.

“We were already in the process of closing the pier down,” Scott said.

The pier was closed all of Saturday and part of Sunday. Big attractions like the silent disco and the ferris wheel were also closed for most of the festival.

Nick Arcidy, a 28-year-old San Francisco resident who attended the festival for the first time, said Saturday seemed to be fine until it started to drizzle and then “everything just started to fall apart at that point.”

He said he initially felt prepared, decked out in rainboots and a poncho, but it became clear that the festival’s “rain or shine, the show will go on” attitude applied only to the festival-goers and that the event seemed to have made little to no preparations for the harsh weather.

Arcidy recalled waiting for an hour in the rain for an artist to come on stage.“[It was like] waiting in silence with little to no update,” not even background music, he said.

As the weather worsened, performers’ planes were delayed, set times were pushed back and safety concerns kept big names like Ice Cube from performing until the weather improved.

“The ones that did get to play, they had drastically reduced sets,” Arcidy said.

Slippery wet surfaces and giant puddles checkered the ground. “If you guys prepared for rain, it wouldn’t be like that,” Arcidy said.

Duke Dumont, who was scheduled to perform, did not take the stage and later posted on Twitter, “There were no safety measures in place as they weren’t prepared,” and that “they threatened the acts with not being paid if they didn’t play, and threatened me with not being booked again.”

Scott described Dumont’s tweet as an “extremely unfair portrayal of what happened.” Scott said he is proud of everyone involved in this year’s festival. “The fact that we got 24 out of the 26 artists to play … is a testament to how hard everyone worked behind the scenes to pull the festival off.”

The festival will not be held on Treasure Island next year. A new location has not been announced.Bay Area News

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