Family: Police didn’t make contact after fatal shooting

SFPD officers are shown investigating an officer-involved shooting on St. Patrick's Day 2015.

SFPD officers are shown investigating an officer-involved shooting on St. Patrick's Day 2015.

The 26-year-old Oakland man who was fatally shot by San Francisco police while allegedly aiding in a car break-in Tuesday night near AT&T Park was struck twice after pointing an unloaded pistol at a police officer, according to Police Chief Greg Suhr.

“He pointed the gun at the officer,” Suhr said at a community meeting about the shooting Thursday night. “The firearm … turns out was not loaded.”

In front of the vocally angry family of Oshaine Evans — the man killed Tuesday — Suhr explained how a single officer fired seven rounds and fatally hit Evans after he allegedly aimed the weapon at the officer from the driver's seat of a vehicle.

It was the third fatal officer-involved shooting and the seventh officer-involved shooting this year.

The officer, Suhr said, also struck a 27-year-old San Leandro man who was in the back seat with one round. He remains hospitalized and has yet to be charged, so his name has not been released. A third suspect, Steven Oliver Moore, 23, of Oakland, has been charged with homicide, among other charges, because Evans died during the crime, police said.

After describing the details of the incident, Evans' family drilled Suhr with questions about Tuesday night and asked why the family had not been told about the meeting or been contacted by the police about Evans' death.

“It's almost as if you didn't want us here,” Massina Moore, 28, Evans' niece, told Suhr, adding that the story of what happened remains unclear.

“I believe I would like to give my family member the benefit of the doubt,” she said. “This seems out of character of my family member.”

Angela Naggie, Evans' mother, said she was first contacted by the department Thursday night at the meeting and only knew about the meeting because of the media. She has not yet seen her son's body, she said.

Suhr, who apologized for the department's failure to notify the family about the meeting, said he was glad they had come and said he would stay in contact with them.

The incident, near 448 Bryant St., began around 8:16 p.m. when uniformed officers started following a car with the three men who then allegedly broke into a Mercedes SUV and took items from the vehicle. The officers approached wearing plain-clothes shirts over their uniforms and identified themselves as police. When Evans allegedly aimed a pistol he was holding in his lap at police, an officer opened fire.

Suhr said the department would release the names of the officers involved in the incident within a few days.

Bay Area NewsCrimeCrime & Courtsofficer-involved shootingOshaine EvansSan Francisco Police

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