Facelift slated for Bayview community hub

Quintin Johnson has been a patron at the Bayview Library since she was 5. Now, as an adult, she comes by regularly to pick out books for her children, 2 and 8.

For residents such as Johnson, the library is something of a second home — and that second home is about to be rebuilt from the ground up.

The Bayview branch was built in the late 1960s, a 6,000-square-foot bunker-style building on the corner of Third Street and Revere Avenue, and hasn’t changed much since, branch manager Linda Brooks Burton said.

The Library Commission last week approved the $1.3 million purchase of a building next door, paving the way for a complete tear-down and rebuild in 2010, Deputy City Librarian Jill Bourne said.

“It’s time for a change,” Johnson agreed.

Between $9.89 million and $10.26 million in voter-approved bond funds will pay for the construction, which is tentatively scheduled to begin in early 2010, with the library reopening in late 2011, Bourne said.

Every area, from the meeting room to the children’s area, will be expanded in the new library, which also will have an area just for teens — the first of its kind in the San Francisco Public Library system, Burton said.

It will also play up green-building practices, including solar panels and possibly a roof garden, and a much lighter, more open feel.

“I keep telling people it’s going to be the blingiest thing on the block,” Burton said. “I mean that it will set a tone for the redevelopment of this area, and of the design standards to come. The community deserves something beautiful.”

Although architects are only beginning to design what the new, 9,000-square-foot building will look like, it’s being crafted with significant community input, said designer David Keltner, with Thomas Hacker Architects. The community will meet Sept. 8 to discuss possibilities.

“Our meetings on this project were the most attended and positive we had ever seen,” Keltner said. “The community is super behind this project.”

While the branch is closed, the Bayview YMCA has agreed to set up a temporary library space for up to two years, Burton said.

bwinegarner@sfexaminer.com

Bayview’s rebuild

What: Bayview Branch, 5075 Third St.

Built: Late 1960s

Size: Roughly 6,000 square feet

Rebuild cost: $9.89 million to $10.26 million, from bonds”

Closure date: Early 2010*

Reopen date: Late 2011*

New size: 9,000 square feet

*Estimates

Source: San Francisco Public Library

My Story

“I’m here every day. They have a lot of books available that I like to read, and I can get on a computer here. I don’t have one at home.”

Aushantee Dorton, 18, Bayview resident, pre-med student at City College of San Francisco.

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