Face-lift for Millbrae’s Central Park nears completion

The long awaited Central Park renovation project, complete with improved access and a better drainage system, should wrap up by the beginning of October.

The park, at 477 Lincoln Circle, will boast new pathways, improved ADA accessibility and an enhanced drainage system — something that officials particularly noticed the need for during the heavy spring rains.

The main field is shaped like a bowl, and it took a long time to drain water from it, Community Development Director Ralph Petty said.

Spring rain aside, the project was one the city was considering for a while, but didn’t have the funds to carry through.

With park-in-lieu fees streaming in from several new developments along El Camino Real and near the Millbrae BART station, however, the city was able to finally get the $600,000 project under way, Petty said.

Funding comes from three sources — the park-in-lieu fees, state grants and redevelopment money.

“[The project] is addressing a big piece of the park that we needed to focus on,” Petty said.

Work started in the beginning of July and will likely wrap up in the beginning of October, Petty said. Mayor Robert Gottschalk touted the renovations being done earlier this summer in his state of the city address and noted that the turf play areas and removal of outdated equipment were priorities.

Councilman Marc Hershman, who visited the park on Sunday for the last Concert in the Park, said he was pleased with the amount of work being done on the park. Hershman said that the park pathways didn’t meet up cleanly with the play areas, and it presented some challenges for people with strollers — a large part of the park’s regular visitors.

He noted that even though the concert had to be moved to a patio area near the city’s community center because of the construction, it may be a better spot for next year’s concerts in the park.

“It was really fortuitous in a way to find this really great, intimate spot we could use for next year,” Hershman said.

tramroop@examiner.com

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