Engineers meet to discuss Larchmont landslide homes

Geotechnical engineering experts met Thursday to discuss the best way to stabilize the hillside in Broadmoor Village that slid during last spring’s wet weather.

The experts discussed a stitch wall behind 604, 606 and portions of 608 Larchmont Drive andthe additional information that needs to be collected to approve such a wall, County Building Inspection Manager William Cameron said.

Such information would be gathered from borings and instruments in the ground to check moisture levels and slippage, Cameron said.

Last April, 606 Larchmont Drive, now owned by Multisource Realty’s Stan Brody, sunk approximately 25 feet and slid about 10 feet to the west during a mudslide. That slide displaced part of the hillside and threatened a handful of homes below it on MacArthur Drive.

The Board of Supervisors recently directed county staff to hire a demolition company to tear the house down, but a judge last week granted a stay on any demolition until a Jan. 9 hearing.

Brody’s attorney, George Eshoo, said that the Jan. 9 hearing would determine whether or not there was due process in the Board of Supervisors’ decision.

“Everybody has the same goal, and that’s that there’s safety in the neighborhood,” Eshoo said.

Brody said leaving the house in place and doing the recommended repairs would serve as a stabilizer to the slope, but residents along MacArthur are tired of the problem.

“It’s been a hardship for everybody,” said Michael Brodeur, the pastor at the Promised Land Fellowship church in San Francisco, who said the neighborhood petitioned the county not to let homes be built at the locations on Larchmont Drive.

“The glory of saying ‘I told you so’ doesn’t compensate for the pain of the situation,” Brodeur said.

dsmith@examiner.com

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