Employee crushed in printing accident

A workplace accident has killed a worker for the second time in as many days in The City.

A 26-year-old Oakland woman died in an apparent workplace accident Tuesday morning after she was sucked into heavy machinery at a Potrero Hill printing company.

The victim was identified by the San Francisco Medical Examiner’s office as Margarita Mojica.

Mojica became “entangled” in a cutting and creasing machine, which crushed her head, neck and chest, according to Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White.

“It’s hard to tell whether her article of clothing was caught,” Hayes-White said. “I wouldn’t necessarily say she fell.”

Rescue crews arrived at Digital Pre-Press International at 645 Mariposa St. four minutes after the Fire Department received a 911 call about 11:30 a.m., according to Hayes-White.

Mojica was freed within seven minutes. After she was freed, however, she wasn’t breathing and she had no pulse, according to Hayes-White. Efforts to revive her failed and she was pronounced dead at the scene.

“The workplace, I believe, employs about 80 people, and it seemed like a family run, tight-knit business,” Hayes-White said.

Attempts to contact the owner of the company were unsuccessful. Police are investigating the accident, according to Hayes-White.

“They’ll look at the machinery,” she said.

An investigator from the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health also attended the accident scene Tuesday, according to spokeswoman Kate McGuire. She said an investigation would likely take two to three months to complete.

Digital Pre-Press International has not been cited for violating any health and safety codes during the past five years, according to McGuire.

The City sent experts to the accident scene to counsel Mojica’s “really shaken up” co-workers, according to Fire Department spokesman Ken Smith.

jupton@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

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