Electricity still out for many

After the storms of the weekend subsided, there were still 340 residences in San Francisco without power — 98 of the households left without electricity for more than two days.

The households remain the top priority for repair in San Francisco, said Darlene Chiu, spokesperson for Pacific Gas and Electric Co., although she added it is not certain whether power would be restored to them by Monday night.

The 340 households were in different parts of San Francisco: Sections of the Bayview, specifically around the Carroll Avenue and Jennings Street intersection, as well as Noe Valley and Mission neighborhoods. The Bayview homes lost electricity sometime on Sunday, Chiu said, while the others lost it on Saturday.

Even though Sunday’s rainfall was minimal, new power outages still occurred because of tree braches falling on power lines, or winds snapping the poles lines together.

Chiu said she expects power to be restored in all San Francisco homes by Tuesday morning at the latest.

Monday’s sunny skies were a reprieve from the past weekend’s stormy conditions, but with heavy rains forecasted for this week, Chiu said that PG&E has alerted its customers they could be without power once again.

“It’s very hard to predict what areas will lose power because of the weather,” Chiu said. Power has been restored to all 58,000 San Francisco households that lost power on Friday, during the first day of the storm.

wreisman@examiner.com

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