Effort to rid S.F. of eyesores is ramped up

The effort to rid The City’s busiest commercial districts of graffiti, litter and other eyesores has double the funding in the 2007-08 budget, allowing 100 more corridors to be scrutinized daily for filth.

The Community Corridors program launched in November with $1.8 million in city funding. The program is focused on 100 blocks within 19 commercial corridors throughout San Francisco.

The key component is monitoring by Department of Public Works employees who inspect and maintain one corridor each, five days a week, to ensure cleanliness.

This year, $3.8 million was allocated for the program, which has been championed by Mayor Gavin Newsom, allowing another 100 commercial strips to be added.

“It’s like having a handyman on the block,” Public Works Deputy Director Mohammed Nuru said.

The monitors are charged with getting the appropriate city department on a job, as well as talking to merchants and building owners about their responsibilities to do such maintenance as clean up graffiti — or pay The City to do the job.

As a result of the monitoring, 305 citations were written for such infractions as excessive litter, illegal signage and not retrieving trash cans from sidewalks after trash day, according to Department of Public Works data. Additionally, 318 citations were given to property owners with sidewalks in need of repair.

Nuru said legal notices and citations are last resorts, and that most of the neighborhood merchants are working to keep corridors clean.

Monitors for the additional 100 blocks are being hired, Nuru said.

Business leaders in the newly chosen neighborhoods said they were open to programs that make commercial corridors look clean, safe and inviting on an ongoing basis. Several questioned, however, the wisdom of focusing on one street.

“What about Ninth Avenue?” Inner Sunset Merchant Association President Craig Dawson said when he heard The City would focus its efforts on Irving Street from Sixth Avenue to Funston. “It’s a horrible, graffiti-infested corridor.”

‘Community Corridors’ program

Thirty-eight of San Francisco’s busiest commercial corridors will receive Department of Public Works inspections five days a week.

DISTRICT 1

New: Geary Boulevard, from Arguello Boulevard to Seventh Avenue

New: Geary Boulevard, from 17th Avenue to 23rd Avenue

Ongoing: Clement Street, from Arguello Boulevard. To 10th Avenue

DISTRICT 2

Ongoing: Chestnut Street, from Fillmore Street to Divisadero Street

DISTRICT 3

New: Kearny, from Columbus Street to California Street

New: Polk Street, from California Street to Broadway

Ongoing: Columbus Street from Powell Street to Pacific Avenue

Ongoing: Grant Avenue, from Broadway to California Street

Ongoing: Stockton Street, from Green Street to Sacramento Street

DISTRICT 4

New:Taraval Street from 18th Avenue to 23rd Avenue

Ongoing: Irving Street, from 19th Avenue to 25th Avenue

DISTRICT 5

New: Haight Street, from Masonic Avenue to Central Avenue

New: Divisadero Street, from Geary Street to McAllister Street

New: Irving, from Sixth Avenue to Funston Avenue

Ongoing: Haight Street, from Stanyan Street to Masonic Avenue

Ongoing: Haight Street. from Divisadero Street to Webster Street

Ongoing: Divisadero Street, from Haight Street to McAllister Street

DISTRICT 6

New: 16th Street, from Valencia Street to Folsom Street

New: Valencia Street, from 16th Street to 17th Street

New: Geary Street, from Jones Street to Van Ness Avenue

Ongoing: Polk Street, from California Street to O’Farrell Street

Ongoing: Larkin Street, from Sacramento Street to O’Farrell Street

DISTRICT 7

Ongoing: West Portal Avenue, from Ulloa Street to 14th Avenue

DISTRICT 8

New: Church Street, from Market Street to 18th Street

New: 18th Street, from Church Street to Dolores Street

Ongoing: Diamond Street, from Chenery Street to San Jose Avenue

DISTRICT 9

New: 24th Street, from Potrero Street to Folsom Street

New: 24th Street, from Folsom Street to Valencia Street

New: Potrero Street, from 23rd Street to 18th Street

Ongoing: Mission Street, from 14th Street to Cesar Chavez Street

Ongoing: 24th Street, from Potrero Avenue to Valencia Street

Ongoing: San Bruno Avenue, from Silver Avenue to Wayland Street

DISTRICT 10

New: Leland Avenue, from Bayshore to Cora

Ongoing: Third Street, from Jerrold Avenue to Van Dyke Avenue

DISTRICT 11

New: Geneva Avenue, from Alemany Boulevard to Naples Street

New: Naples Street, from Geneva Avenue to Rolph Street

Ongoing: Mission Street, from Excelsior Ave to Rolph Street

Ongoing: Ocean Avenue, from Manor Drive to Phelan Avenue

– Source: SFDPW

beslinger@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

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