Ed Jew puts commission in new waters

A special meeting by the Ethics Commission to determine how it will proceed with a misconduct hearing on suspended supervisor Ed Jew will not happen this week but possibly next week, according to the commission’s executive director, John St. Croix.

The commission is making political history by holding its first ever misconduct hearing for an elected official after Mayor Gavin Newsom suspended Jew from office on Sept. 25 and charged him with official misconduct for allegedly not living in the district he represents, as is required.

Under the City Charter, the Ethics Commission must hold a misconduct hearing on the charge and make a recommendation to the Board of Supervisors.

The misconduct charge mentions the federal mail fraud charge federal prosecutors filed against Jew on Sept. 20 in connection with an alleged bribery scheme.

Jew is also being tried in criminal court by the district attorney on nine felony counts based on the allegation that he lied about where he lived in order to run for office. Prosecutors say Jew was living in Burlingame with his wife and daughter and not in the 28th Avenue house in the Sunset as he claimed on election-related documents.

The commission will first hold a special administrative hearing with the interested parties, including the city attorney, Jew and his attorney, and then vote on what will be the “parameters” of the misconduct hearings. The special meeting would take place, St. Croix said, “not this week,” but possibly next week.

Jew’s attorney Steven Gruelhas said that he would like the hearings to be just like a court room, granting him the power to subpoena witnesses.

If the commission decides to remove Jew from office, it would take a three-fourths vote of support by the Board of Supervisors to do so.

jsabatini@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsLocalPolitics

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

San Francisco Public Bank Coalition advocates rallied on Feb. 5, 2019 as the Board of Supervisors considered supporting the creation of a public banking charter. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Debate reignites over San Francisco’s first public bank

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, momentum was building for San Francisco to… Continue reading

Apprenticeship instructor Mike Miller, center, demonstrates how to set up a theodolite, a hyper-sensitive angle measuring device, for apprentices Daniel Rivas, left, Ivan Aguilar, right, and Quetzalcoatl Orta, far right, at the Ironworkers Local Union 377 training center in Benicia on June 10, 2021. (Courtesy Anne Wernikoff/CalMatters)
California’s affordable housing crisis: Are labor union requirements in the way?

By Manuela Tobias CalMatters California lawmakers introduced several bills this year that… Continue reading

Mayor London Breed spoke at the reopening of the San Francisco Public Library main branch on April 20. (Sebastian Miño-Bucheli/Special to The Examiner)
SF reopening more libraries through the summer

After a handful of San Francisco public libraries reopened last month for… Continue reading

A new production of Beethoven’s “Fidelio” directed by Matthew Ozawa and designed by Alexander V. Nichols will be onstage at the War Memorial Opera House in October. (Courtesy Alexander V. Nichols)
SF Opera announces transitional 99th season

Company returns to Opera House with downsized schedule, no fall ball

Most Read