Ed Jew at City Hall: 'Business as usual'

The center of an FBI investigation, Supervisor Ed Jew showed up Tuesday morning at City Hall and made every attempt to make it business as usual.

The District 4 supervisor did not seem rattled by the group of media reporters and cameramen who stormed into his office as he attempted to head to Tuesday’s 2 p.m. Board of Supervisors meeting, and was chased by reporters as he left his office to go to the bathroom.

Jew declined to comment on the FBI investigation and briefly addressed the media to say, “I want to thank the district’s constituents and my family and my wife and my daughter and the Chinese community for their really deep support and their phone calls and e-mails.”

On Friday, the FBI raided Jew’s City Hall office, his Chinatown flower shop and other properties connected to him. Since the raid, Jew said his days are back to “business as usual.” His attorney and former federal prosecutor Steven Gruel has called the investigation an “apparent misunderstanding.”

The raid centers around his involvement with three owners of Quickly tapioca franchise drink shops in the Sunset district who came to Jew for city permitting help, according to Jew. The supervisor said he referred the owners to Robert Chan, of Bridge Consulting, to help them secure the permits.

Since Saturday, Jew has refused to answer any questions regarding his reported acceptance of $40,000 cash, which he said was payment for the consultant services. Jew told The Examiner he received $20,000 of the $40,000 to spend on his district needs, and that the FBI confiscated the $20,000 from his safe during the raid. Jew could face federal criminal charges, but to date has not been charged with any crime.

Jew did not speak during Tuesday’s board meeting other than to cast verbal votes in the affirmative or negative on board initiatives.

During the meeting, board members made no reference to the FBI investigation, although at one point Supervisor Tom Ammiano spoke to the importance of being a city supervisor and said, “Let’s not toy with this job.” He added, “If we can’t handle it, then we should leave.”

Prior to the meeting, Ammiano said, “It’s very awkward for everyone. No one has malice toward Supervisor Jew, but the sooner this is expedited, the better.”

jsabatini@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsLocalPolitics

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Chase Center and the Golden State Warriors hosted a media Welcome Back conference to discuss the safety protocols and amenities when fans return for a basketball game on April 23rd at Chase Center on April 13, 2021 in San Francisco, California. (Photography by Chris Victorio | Special to the S.F. Examiner).
Golden State Warriors ready to welcome fans back to Chase Center

COVID-19 tests, app-based food ordering among new safety protocols announced this week

People came out in numbers to memorialize George Floyd, who was fatally shot by police, outside San Francisco City Hall on June 9, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFPD prepares for possible protests as Chauvin trial continues

Police to schedule community meetings, provide officers with crowd control training

Mayor London Breed said Tuesday that with other counties moving ahead with expanding vaccine eligibility “we want San Franciscans to have the same opportunity.” (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Everyone in SF ages 16 and up is now eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine

San Francisco expanded eligibility for the COVID-19 vaccine Tuesday to everyone ages… Continue reading

San Francisco Park Rangers have seen their budget and staffing levels increase significantly since 2014. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Citations for being in SF’s public parks after midnight soar

Data shows disproportionate impact on Black residents

Central City SRO Collective tenant leader Reggie Reed, left, and Eddie Ahn, executive director of Brightline Defense, were among those distributing environmental awareness posters throughout the Tenderloin, Mid-Market and South of Market neighborhoods. (Courtesy Central City SRO Collaborative)
Environmental dangers are connected to racism

Let’s attack problems with better policies, greater awareness

Most Read