Ed Jew agrees to resign in deal with city

A city supervisor charged with demanding bribes from businessmen and lying about where he lives to run for office has agreed to resign, city officials announced Thursday.

Mayor Gavin Newsom and others had been trying for months to get Ed Jew to resign from the Board of Supervisors. Newsom had suspended him from the 11-member board pending the outcome of the proceedings against him.

“It's an important day to get behind us. It's long overdue,” Newsom said.

In a statement read by his attorney, Jew said he was resigning “not only from the Board of Supervisors, but from public service.” Jew said he decided to leave office because the cost of defending the civil and criminal cases was too much to bear.

City officials said that in exchange for Jew's resignation, they agreed to drop their ethics investigation and a lawsuit that sought to permanently remove him from office. The resignation is effective at noon Friday.

“This is not about Ed Jew. This is about the reputation of the political process,” Newsom said.

In November, Jew pleaded not guilty in federal court to bribery, extortion and fraud for allegedly demanding $80,000 from fast food restaurant owners to make help expedite permits and other business with the planning department.

He faces separate state charges of election fraud for allegedly lying about living in San Francisco to qualify to represent the city's western neighborhoods. He has pleaded not guilty in that case as well.

In his statement, Jew said he moved his family to San Mateo because his wife had breast cancer and wanted to be closer to her mother and sisters.

Associated Press Writer Paul Elias contributed to this report.

Bay Area NewsLocal

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