Proposition G would allow teens — activists marching to address climate change are pictured — to vote in San Francisco elections. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Proposition G would allow teens — activists marching to address climate change are pictured — to vote in San Francisco elections. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Prop. G, which would give 16- and 17-year-olds the vote in local elections, narrowly failing

San Francisco votes counted thus far are rejecting a repeat effort to allow 16- and 17-year-olds to vote in local elections.

Returns released Wednesday afternoon showProposition G losing, with 49.37 percent approval separated by nearly 6,000 votes in a gap that has widened since Election Night. The Department has roughly 90,000 votes left to process.

The measure would allow teens to vote on local matters, making San Francisco the first major city nationwide to give young people that right.

Supervisor Norman Yee put the charter amendment on the ballot after voters narrowly rejected the first attempt in 2016. But teen activism has surged in the past four years, and particularly in 2020 as Black Lives Matter protests erupted. Young people took a stand on gun violence, police brutality and climate change in national movements that often called out adults in power for failing them.

Proponents argue Prop. G would instill civic engagement at an early age, and give young people, who historically vote in low numbers, the opportunity to have a say in issues that directly affect them.

“The 2016 election and its fallout really served as a catalyst for this new wave of youth activism that we just haven’t seen before,” said Arianna Nassiri, who sits on the Youth Commission and directs the local chapter of Vote16 to increase youth voting abilities, in May. “They serve as evidence that young people are aware, politically active, and engaging in the political process. We’re seeing young people drive, pay taxes, enrolled in San Francisco Unified School District in large numbers, and yet completely disenfranchised from taking part in this system.”

This article has been updated with the latest election results.

Bay Area NewsElection 2020san francisco news

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Nicole Canedo looks at her City-issued Medical Reimbursement Account page on her computer outside her Berkeley apartment on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2020. Canedo has worked numerous retail jobs in The City and the MRA has helped her with health costs. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Millions left sitting in medical reimbursement accounts by city workers

Health officials looking at how to improve access, outreach as untapped funds reach $409M

Dr. Grant Colfax, director of the San Francisco Department of Public Health. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SF moves into purple tier, triggering curfew and business shutdowns

San Francisco moved into the state’s purple COVID-19 tier Saturday, requiring The… Continue reading

Indecline, an art activist collective in San Francisco, transformed a billboard into an editorial with a message blasting immigration policies of Donald Trump’s administration. (Screenshot, Indecline website)
Has immigration fallen off the administration’s radar? Not a chance

Enforced as executive orders, Trump’s hardline policies are proceeding, against will of the people

University of San Francisco head coach Todd Golden coaches his team on defense during a 2019 gameat War Memorial Gymnasium on the campus of the University of San Francisco. (Ryan Gorcey / S.F. Examiner)
Stunner in Bubbleville: USF upsets fourth-ranked Virginia

Less than 48 hours removed from a loss to a feeble UMass… Continue reading

A dinner at three Michelin Stars restaurant The French Laundry in Yountville, Napa Valley has highlighted Gov. Gavin Newsom’s relationship with a well-known lobbyist. (Leonard Zhukovsky/Shutterstock)
The lobbyist who led Gavin Newsom to the French Laundry has a history of controversy

Lara Korte and Sophia Bollag The Sacramento Bee When photos circulated earlier… Continue reading

Most Read