Proposition G would allow teens — activists marching to address climate change are pictured — to vote in San Francisco elections. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Proposition G would allow teens — activists marching to address climate change are pictured — to vote in San Francisco elections. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Prop. G, which would give 16- and 17-year-olds the vote in local elections, narrowly failing

San Francisco votes counted thus far are rejecting a repeat effort to allow 16- and 17-year-olds to vote in local elections.

Returns released Wednesday afternoon showProposition G losing, with 49.37 percent approval separated by nearly 6,000 votes in a gap that has widened since Election Night. The Department has roughly 90,000 votes left to process.

The measure would allow teens to vote on local matters, making San Francisco the first major city nationwide to give young people that right.

Supervisor Norman Yee put the charter amendment on the ballot after voters narrowly rejected the first attempt in 2016. But teen activism has surged in the past four years, and particularly in 2020 as Black Lives Matter protests erupted. Young people took a stand on gun violence, police brutality and climate change in national movements that often called out adults in power for failing them.

Proponents argue Prop. G would instill civic engagement at an early age, and give young people, who historically vote in low numbers, the opportunity to have a say in issues that directly affect them.

“The 2016 election and its fallout really served as a catalyst for this new wave of youth activism that we just haven’t seen before,” said Arianna Nassiri, who sits on the Youth Commission and directs the local chapter of Vote16 to increase youth voting abilities, in May. “They serve as evidence that young people are aware, politically active, and engaging in the political process. We’re seeing young people drive, pay taxes, enrolled in San Francisco Unified School District in large numbers, and yet completely disenfranchised from taking part in this system.”

This article has been updated with the latest election results.

Bay Area NewsElection 2020san francisco news

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

A San Francisco Unified School District program that gave would-be teachers extra training in the classroom has lost a key partner. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/2019 S.F. Examiner)</ins>
USF ends partnership with SFUSD in teacher residency program

District launched training effort to improve low retention rates for new hires

The Rev. Norman Fong of the Chinatown Community Development Center joined San Francisco city leaders and community partners in a “Campaign for Solidarity” at Civic Center Plaza on Saturday, Apr 17, 2021. (CraigLee/Special to the S.F. Examiner)
City launches ‘Campaign for Solidarity’ to combat racial violence

Mayor London Breed, the city’s Human Rights Commission and community leaders launched… Continue reading

It’s time to break the code of silence and end the stigmatism against infertility, which is fairly common. <ins>(Shuttterstock)</ins>
Struggles with infertility are common

We all can support friends, ask legislators to mandate sppropriate insurance

Former Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs spoke to San Francisco’s new Guaranteed Income Advisory Group on April 16. (Courtesy SFGOV)
City launches task force to explore Universal Basic Income programs

San Francisco on Friday launched a guaranteed income task force that could… Continue reading

Muni’s K-Ingleside line will return six months earlier than previously announced. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
K-Ingleside train to return on May 15

Announcement comes on the heels of pressure from Supervisor Myrna Melgar

Most Read