Proposition G would allow teens — activists marching to address climate change are pictured — to vote in San Francisco elections. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Proposition G would allow teens — activists marching to address climate change are pictured — to vote in San Francisco elections. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

Prop. G, which would give 16- and 17-year-olds the vote in local elections, narrowly failing

San Francisco votes counted thus far are rejecting a repeat effort to allow 16- and 17-year-olds to vote in local elections.

Returns released Wednesday afternoon showProposition G losing, with 49.37 percent approval separated by nearly 6,000 votes in a gap that has widened since Election Night. The Department has roughly 90,000 votes left to process.

The measure would allow teens to vote on local matters, making San Francisco the first major city nationwide to give young people that right.

Supervisor Norman Yee put the charter amendment on the ballot after voters narrowly rejected the first attempt in 2016. But teen activism has surged in the past four years, and particularly in 2020 as Black Lives Matter protests erupted. Young people took a stand on gun violence, police brutality and climate change in national movements that often called out adults in power for failing them.

Proponents argue Prop. G would instill civic engagement at an early age, and give young people, who historically vote in low numbers, the opportunity to have a say in issues that directly affect them.

“The 2016 election and its fallout really served as a catalyst for this new wave of youth activism that we just haven’t seen before,” said Arianna Nassiri, who sits on the Youth Commission and directs the local chapter of Vote16 to increase youth voting abilities, in May. “They serve as evidence that young people are aware, politically active, and engaging in the political process. We’re seeing young people drive, pay taxes, enrolled in San Francisco Unified School District in large numbers, and yet completely disenfranchised from taking part in this system.”

This article has been updated with the latest election results.

Bay Area NewsElection 2020san francisco news

Just Posted

San Franciscans are likely to have the opportunity to vote in four different elections in 2022. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Electionpalooza: SF school board recall will kick off a flurry of local races

‘It’s going to be a lot of elections and a lot of decisions for voters to make’

Four young politicos were elected to various city councils on the Peninsula in 2020. From left: Redwood City councilmember Michael Smith; South San Francisco councilmember James Coleman; Redwood City councilmember Lissette Espinoza-Garnica; and East Palo Alto councilmember Antonio Lopez. (Examiner Illustration/Courtesy Photos)
Progressive politicians rise to power on the Peninsula. Will redistricting reverse the trend?

‘There’s this wave of young people really trying to shake things up’

The fate of San Francisco nicotine giant Juul remains to be seen, as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is reviewing whether to allow certain flavored vape products on the market. <ins>(Jeenah Moon/New York Times)</ins>
How the vape king of teen nicotine addiction rose and fell in San Francisco

‘Hey, Juul, don’t let the door hit you on the way out’

Cabernet sauvignon grapes sat in a container after being crushed at Smith-Madrone Winery in St. Helena. (Courtesy Smith-Madrone Winery)
San Francisco’s ‘Champagne problems’ — Wine industry suffers supply chain woes

‘Everywhere you turn, things that were easy are no longer easy’

The Nudge is a startup that points users who sign up for text notifications to fun experiences and buzzworthy places. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
The ‘anti-startup’ aims to get people off their phones and into the world

‘I realized actually doing things made me happy’

Most Read