Dump couch on sidewalk, face fine

Think again if you thought it was perfectly legal to chuck your old couch on the sidewalk for anyone’s taking.

The Department of Public Works recently put out a friendly reminder on Twitter warning that residents face fines between $200 and $1,000 for such “illegal dumping.”

Dumping household items on city streets is against the law, the agency said.

An average of 24 tons of refuse left on the streets and in vacant lots is hauled away daily, DPW said. The City’s worst illegal dumping sites are in the southeast neighborhoods such as the Bayview, Visitacion Valley and Excelsior districts, it said.

Illegal dumping costs the city $2 million annually, DPW said.

DPW officials said they have been sifting through illegal dumping sites for evidence that will lead to suspects. The agency requests residents who witness illegal dumping to report the act by phoning 311.

“There is a better way,” it said.

The agency suggests residents donate the items they don’t want to Goodwill or Salvation Army, call Sunset Scavenger Company or Golden Gate Recycling and Disposal for a free pickup, or take advantage of the agency’s Community Clean Team program, which offers annual free drop off of bulky items, composting and recycling materials.

Bay Area NewsDepartment of Public WorksSan FranciscoUnder the Dome

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