Drug sales targeted near Lincoln

Police at Taraval Station have been cracking down on drug peddling near Abraham Lincoln High School, a recurring issues that has spiked again in recent months.

Officers have arrested or cited four suspects who were carrying marijuana, most of them attempting to sell the drug on the streets surrounding the high school, according to police reports.

Two adults were arrested on Quintara Street in late January and mid-February, and a 15-year-old was arrested March 5 at the corner of 22nd Avenue and Taraval Street. Another teen was cited March 6 for marijuana possessionat Lincoln, according to Sgt. Neville Gittens.

Drugs are not a new problem near the school, neighbors say.

“Most of us have put gates in front of our doors because the kids come up here and smoke their weed in the doorways,” said one man who didn’t want to give his name because he lives close to campus, at 23rd Avenue and Quintara Street.

Police were first tipped off to drug-related activity when neighbors, merchants and school administrators complained about marijuana sales near the school, according to police Capt. Paul Chignell. Plainclothes officers set up surveillance areas and arrested several dealers, including the teenager on March 5, according to Lt. John Feeney.

Lincoln High School Principal Ron Pang said he has been vocal about the need to continue the surveillance because he wants to make sure dealers aren’t preying on students. He also assured parents that their children are safe.

“This is not an issue specific to Lincoln,” San Francisco Unified School District spokeswoman Gentle Blythe said. “It’s something all high schools need to work with police on.”

Although police say they believe they have caught several prime suspects, “this is in no way an end [to the issue],” Feeney said, adding that high-school students provide a steady stream of customers. “When you take someone down like that, there’s usually someone to fill in behind them.”

bwinegarner@examiner.com

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