Driver suffers from case of tunnel vision

Late-night Muni service in the subway to West Portal recently resumed, but one allegedly drunken driver may have taken the idea a bit too far.

Alexey Serdyukov, 27, drove his 2005 Nissan Maxima in the West Portal tunnel just before 2 a.m. Tuesday and managed to get all the way past the Forest Hills Station before the vehicle’s tires became stuck in the underground tunnel’s increasingly narrow passage, according to San Francisco police Sgt. Wilfred Williams.

Just a few hundred feet from the Castro station, the San Francisco resident ditched his car and walked back along the tracks to the West Portal station, where police, who were tipped off about the incident by a Muni worker who witnessed the spectacle, were waiting for him, Williams said.

“He told the officers on the scene that he thought the tunnel looked like a street,” Williams said. “When you’re that inebriated I guess it’s easy to get confused.”

Serdyukov was booked on two counts of drunken driving — the second count added due to his high blood alcohol content — and failure to obey traffic signs, according to Williams. The infractions were all misdemeanors, Williams said.

This is not the first time a motorist has attempted to travel in Muni’s underground system.

While unable to cite specific numbers, both Williams and Municipal Transportation Agency spokesman Judson True said there have been instances ofcars careering down Muni tunnels in the past.

The entrance to the West Portal station was open last night because Muni workers were making some final checks on the recently completed track improvement project for the underground tunnel, True said.

“We’re looking into options to make sure this doesn’t happen again,” True said.

wreisman@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocalTransittransportation

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