DPW sprucing up The City

Santa’s not the only who’s been visiting your neighborhood lately.

For the last four months, city agencies and garbage companies have been conducting early morning inspections of San Francisco’s busiest streets to check for violations of city ordinances that could affect quality of life in those neighborhoods.

The program, called Spruce Up by Sun Up, is four months in, and most of the 300 scheduled visits have been completed, according to a Department of Public Works release. They’ve analyzed some of the data they’ve collected during the visits, and here are some highlights:

  • The area with the most city ordinance deficiencies was Mission Street between 18th and 22nd streets — including 217 instances of graffiti.
  • The winner for the street with the fewest deficiencies was 3rd Street between 23rd and Galvez streets in the Bayview.
  • Smokers apparently swarm in the Sunset district, where inspectors found 62 properties with excessive amounts of cigarette butts on their sidewalk.
  • Sidewalks were particularly in need of a scrubbing on Geary Street from Mason Street to Van Ness Avenue, where inspectors found 36 properties in need of regular power-washing.
  • Excelsior district residents didn’t have their garbage together: on Mission street from Harrington to France streets, 46 homes did not have garbage service, which is mandatory.
  • Trees were in sorry shape in West Portal, from Ulloa Street to 14th Avenue, where 118 trees were found that were in need of proper maintenance.
  • Inspectors found themselves in the dark along Ocean Avenue between Phelan and Capitol avenues, where there were 10 street light outages. These have since been repaired.
  • Public Works abated a hazard along 24th Street between Potrero and Folsom, where 48 tree basins were not flush with the sidewalk, creating potential for a bad trip or fall.

Spruce Up By Sun Up is on a brief hiatus for the holidays but will begin again in January and should be completed by February, according to DPW.

The campaign will restart in January, in the South of Market area, and continue on through February 2011.

DPW is responsible for the care and maintenance of San Francisco’s streets and much of its infrastructure. The department cleans and resurfaces streets; plants and maintains city street trees; designs, constructs and maintains city-owned facilities; inspects streets and sidewalks; constructs curb ramps; removes graffiti from public property; and partners with the diverse neighborhoods in San Francisco to provide stellar cleaning and greening services.

More information is available at www.sfdpw.org.

kworth@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsDepartment of Public WorksneighborhoodsSan FranciscoSpruce Up by Sun Up

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