Dozier guilty in Mission rapes, faces life term

Courtesy PhotoFrederick A. Dozier

Courtesy PhotoFrederick A. Dozier

A solemn mixture of relief and sadness permeated the Hall of Justice on Tuesday after a vicious serial rapist who prowled the Mission district last year was convicted on 25 of 26 charges related to the three brutal attacks.

Frederick Dozier Jr. sat virtually emotionless as a court clerk read off “guilty” 25 times. The only count in which Dozier was found not guilty was attempted murder.

Even so, prosecutors said, Dozier faces multiple life-in-prison terms when he is sentenced, which is expected to be Dec. 14.

“Frankly, he’s an animal,” District Attorney George Gascón said after Tuesday’s hearing.

The early morning assaults along the 24th Street corridor June 17, Nov. 18 and Dec. 8 of last year had the neighborhood on edge until Dozier was arrested in January.

But the scars remain. Before the verdicts were read Tuesday, one of the victims sobbed outside the courtroom. And during the hearing, Dozier’s loved ones — who declined to comment — appeared distraught.

During a post-hearing news conference, only one question was asked: whether Gascón was disappointed that Dozier wasn’t pinned for attempted murder.

The jury did what it was supposed to do, Gascón said, which was to lock up Dozier for life.

“This was not an easy case,” he said.

Though the case is closed, Assistant District Attorney Alex Bastian said, the pain remains for survivors.

Mission residents have rallied for the victims. Charles Moser, a member of the Fair Oaks Community Coalition, said his group has raised more than $16,000 for their recovery.

Donations are still being accepted for the 24th Street Survivor Fund, c/o Sterling Bank, 3800 24th St., San Francisco, CA 94132.

Moser said he was “shocked and horrified” after hearing about the third attack, which happened on Fair Oaks Street.

“We live on a small street and we’re used to having some minor crime,” Moser said. “We immediately tried to come together to decide what to do [to help], not knowing there had been two other crimes related.”

The attacks occurred within a mile of Dozier’s Treat Avenue home, prosecutor Marshall Khine said. Two of the women were headed to work and the third was on her way home. Each attack became more brutal. In the November attack, Khine said, the victim was choked and punched after refusing the rapist’s demands. In the December incident, the woman was choked unconscious and then had her face slammed into the sidewalk when she awoke.

DNA evidence linked Dozier to two of the assaults, and in a taped interview with a police detective at the time of his arrest, Dozier allegedly admitted to encountering all three women on the nights of each incident.

maldax@sfexaminer.com

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