The first public hearing on proposed parking rules on Dolores Street during church hours is scheduled for Friday. (Mike Koozmin/S.F. Examiner)

The first public hearing on proposed parking rules on Dolores Street during church hours is scheduled for Friday. (Mike Koozmin/S.F. Examiner)

Dolores Street’s ‘Parking for God’ rules up for debate Friday

San Francisco approved a parking plan for Dolores Street during church hours that critics called “Parking for God” in August, and now the details of the plan are in.

But the precise details of who may park along Dolores Street during church hours, and when, are still up for approval.

SEE RELATED: ‘Parking for God’ pilot approved by transit board

To that end, the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency is planning its first public hearing on the proposed rules Friday.

“This is the next step in approving that plan,” said Paul Rose, a spokesperson for the SFMTA.

The SFMTA approved a formalized pilot parking program for Dolores Street during church hours in August. Hours proposed by staff which will be discussed in Friday’s meeting are Fridays from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., southbound only between 15th and 16th streets; Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., southbound only from 15th to 16th streets; and Sundays 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. northbound and southbound between 14th and 18th streets.

During the 16-month pilot program, the SFMTA will also increase enforcement against parking in spaces between the medians, parking in intersections, and parking outside the permitted hours.

Since before San Francisco was an incorporated city, people living near Mission Dolores have parked there –– only then, it was horses, said church staff in public meetings. And since the rise of cars, San Francisco Police Department officers and later SFMTA parking officers have had an informal system allowing church-goers along Dolores and Guerrero streets to park in the middle of the street by the medians.

That parking came to a head in the last few years, as secular neighbors decried favorable conditions for church-goers on constitutional grounds.Transit

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