Dogs have a good home in San Francisco

3-Minute Interview: A.K. Crump

The editor of the recently released “San Francisco Dogs” chose more than 25 of the Bay Area’s four-legged friends to showcase in the book about being a canine in The City.

Why do you think San Francisco has such a dog obsession? San Francisco tends to be a very nature-oriented society in general, so having animal companions keeps people grounded in their relationship with nature in general.

How did you choose which dogs to include in the book? We put a call out for people to tell us about their dogs. Over about five months, we got different responses, and most were so interesting we felt we had to put them in there. Working on the book, most of the writing is done by people themselves about their dogs.

Were you surprised by the devotion people have to their dogs? I know so many dog owners, and I knew that people love their dogs. But when you read the accounts about how much people love their dogs, it takes it to another level. They really do. When you read through the stories you feel a soft spot opening within yourself. There are 27 dogs in the book and I feel a personal connection with all of them.

What neighborhood do you think is best to have a dog in? Actually, I think from what I read is that everyone’s neighborhood is great for dogs because they all take them to Crissy Field, Fort Funston, Dolores Park and Bernal Heights for big outings.
— Juliana Bunim

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