Disputed pension reform cleared for Nov. 2 ballot

A politically charged ballot measure that would force city workers to pay more for their benefits overcame one legal challenge and will stay on the Nov. 2 ballot.

A coalition of labor unions filed a lawsuit hoping to disqualify Public Defender Jeff Adachi’s Proposition B, the city retirement and health measure. On Monday, Superior Court Judge Harold Khan rejected those arguments.

“This is an important victory for the people of this city,” Adachi said in a statement following the legal ruling. “Now, the voters of San Francisco, not special interests, will finally have a choice on how their tax dollars are spent on pensions for city workers.”

Under the measure, city workers would be forced to pay more into their pensions and for the health benefits of their dependents.

The plaintiffs did score one legal victory when Khan struck a provision from the measure that would “prohibit any increase to employee compensation for affected city employees for five years if a court” finds any portion of the measure could not be enforced. Legal challenges are expected if the measure passes.

Opponents took the opportunity to blast the measure, calling it “ill-conceived and mean-spirited.”

Prop. B would require government employees to contribute between 9 and 10 percent to their pensions and allow a 50-50 share in the cost of dependent health care.

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsJeff AdachiLocalPoliticsSan Francisco

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