‘Dirty look’ prompts double slaying

A shooting Sunday afternoon into a car that started with “a dirty look” killed a father and son and left another son in critical condition, authorities and family members said Monday.

Tony Bologna, 39, and his son Michael Bologna, 20, were found in their blue Honda Civic, which had rolled backward into a parked car, and pronounced dead. Tony’s other son, Matthew Bologna, a student at Lincoln High School, was taken to San Francisco General Hospital with life-threatening injuries. The family members were about seven blocks from the Bolognas’ Excelsior district house.

Police initially reported Monday morning that Matthew had died, but the 16-year-old had undergone two surgeries Sunday night and was not on life support Monday afternoon, according to the family.

Prior to the killings, the Bologna family had gathered Saturday at the Fairfield home of Tony Bologna’s sister, Lorraine Kennedy, for a barbecue.

“He was a great father, a great husband and a great coach,” Kennedy said in a tearful phone interview. “This is senseless. We had a real family, a real family. They took our family away.”

Bologna left Sunday with his sons so he could prepare for his job as a night manager at Draeger’s market in San Mateo, family members said. He exited Interstate 280 at about 3 p.m. and turned southbound on Congdon Street.

When the car crossed Maynard Street, according to police, there was an altercation with the passengers of a second vehicle.

A “dirty look” was exchanged before someone in the suspect vehicle opened fire, Tony Bologna’s sister-in-law, Ninozka Baughman, said she was told by a witness.

Police have not released any suspect information.

Tony Bologna, a native of San Francisco’s Excelsior district, had a wife, daughter and a third son. He coached little league in his spare time.

Draeger’s Store Director Keith Myers said Tony Bologna would never complain about toiling away during the odd hours of a night manager at the market where he had worked for 11 years.

“Tony was aces,” Myers said. “He was a real good worker. He was never late, always early. If he called in sick, you knew there had to be a problem.”

bbegin@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

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