Dhaliwal brother pleads no contest to DUI

The elder of the two Dhaliwal brothers involved in the 2007 tiger attack at the San Francisco Zoo pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor drunken driving charge in San Mateo County Superior Court Tuesday afternoon in exchange for a fine and a two-day jail sentence.

Kulbir Dhaliwal, 25, and his brother, Amritpal Dhaliwal, 21, were arrested early the morning of Aug. 5 in San Mateo after an officer allegedly
found an open bottle of vodka in their car during a traffic stop.

Kulbir Dhaliwal was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence and resisting arrest, and was released on his own recognizance.

He had previously pleaded not guilty to the drunken driving charge but changed his plea at his pretrial conference in the South San Francisco courthouse Tuesday afternoon, Assistant District Attorney Karen Guidotti said.

He received the standard sentence for a misdemeanor DUI, including three years' probation, a $1,631 fine and two days in jail, according to
Guidotti.

With credit for one day served, he must surrender to the San Mateo County jail by Jan. 9, 2010, to serve his remaining day, she said.

Amritpal Dhaliwal, who was arrested for giving a fake name to the officer who pulled them over, pleaded no contest to the charge in early
August and was sentenced to 10 days in jail. He has since served that time and been released.

A San Mateo police officer pulled the brothers over on U.S. Highway 101 near Peninsula Avenue at about 1:45 a.m. Aug. 5 after seeing
their car swerving onto the road's shoulder, prosecutors said.

The officer smelled marijuana and spotted an open bottle of Grey Goose vodka in the car, prosecutors said.

Kulbir Dhaliwal was given a breath test and was found to have a blood-alcohol level of 0.10 percent, according to prosecutors.

Meanwhile, Amritpal Dhaliwal, when asked for his identification, gave the name Tarlock Dhaliwal.

The officer eventually learned the brothers' true identities and discovered that Amritpal Dhaliwal was on parole.

The brothers made headlines after they survived a tiger attack at the San Francisco Zoo on Dec. 25, 2007. The tiger, which escaped from its enclosure, killed their friend, Carlos Sousa Jr., and injured the brothers before being shot dead by police.

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Kindergarten teacher Chris Johnson in his classroom at Bryant Elementary School ahead of the school’s reopening on Friday, April 9, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFUSD students are going back to the classroom

After more than a year of distance learning, city schools begin reopening on Monday

Keith Zwölfer, director of education for SFFILM, stays busy connecting filmmakers and studios with public, private and home schools<ins>.</ins><ins> (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner) </ins>
Streamlined SF film festival focuses on family features

In the early days of the San Francisco International Film Festival, the… Continue reading

“Gay Passover,” a fun Haggadah, includes some cocktail recipes. <ins>(Courtesy Saul Sugarman)</ins>
A Passover journey toward something different

It was nice to see my family, and I look forward to reconnecting with friends

Oakland A’s left fielder Tony Kemp fielded a fly but missed the catch in the April 5 game against the Los Angeles Dodgers at the Oakland Coliseum. <ins>(Chris Victorio/Special to S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Bay Area sports for week of April 11, 2021

A look at the upcoming major Bay Area sports events (schedules subject… Continue reading

The involving historical novel “The Bohemians” imagines photographer Dorothea Lange’s life in San Francisco. (Courtesy photo)
‘Bohemians’ explores life of legendary photographer Dorothea Lange

Artist’s talent, compassion revealed in Jasmin Darznik’s historical novel

Most Read