Developmentto add touch of community

Senior housing proposal has residents split over improvements versus increased traffic and parking woes

DALY CITY — A proposed senior housing development along Sullivan Avenue has some city officials applauding because it will help fill an unmet demand, but others warned that the neighborhood has been wary of projects bringing in more traffic and parking woes.

American Senior Living, Inc. has proposed a 208-unit, mixed-use senior housing development including a 14,000-square-foot Walgreens with a drive-through and a 1,400-square-foot retail space that officials hope will provide some community feel to the area.

The one- and two-bedroom apartments would be available only to individuals 55 or older.

The 3.6-acre property, at the corner of Sullivan and Pierce Street, borders Margaret P. Brown Elementary School to the west, Interstate 280 to the east, a gasoline station to the north and offices and apartments to the south.

City Council Member Carol Klatt served on the Sullivan Corridor Committee that first reviewed a conceptual proposal for the project back in January.

The committee then recommended that the developer create an affordability component, which resulted in 32 “affordability rental units” being added to the proposal, according to the staff report.

Klatt said that they would push for something “community oriented” such as a deli or sandwich shop in the 1,400 square feet of retail space where those living in the development and others could congregate.

“Daly City is getting a larger aging population. The Baby Boomers are starting to retire now,” Klatt said.

“This housing development is very badly needed.”

According to a 2005 American Community Survey, there are roughly 22,000 residents in Daly City ages 55 or older, nearly 24 percent of thetotal 93,500 residents.

In 2000, the survey showed 21,800 people 55 or older, 21 percent of the then-total population of 103,600.

Between 2000 and 2005, the median age went from 35.4 to 37.7 years old.

But Planning Commission Member Ray Satorre said there have been some objections to mixed-use developments from residents in the Broadmoor area, just west of Sullivan Avenue, because of traffic and parking concerns. Such concerns are not uncommon with development proposals in Daly City, he said.

“In any development there is some sort of adjustment to be made,” Satorre said. “We cannot be a bedroom community all the time.”

The city’s zoning ordinance requires 329 parking spaces, but in the project proposal only 210 spaces are provided for the residential portion of the project, according to the staff report.

American Senior Living has requested a parking reduction based on traffic analysis from the Institute of Transportation Engineers. That analysis, according to the report, said the proposed development would only require 86 parking spaces to meet demand from seniors, many of whom will not drive.

The Planning Commission will review this project Tuesday at 7 p.m. in the Council Chambers, 333 90th St., Daly City.

dsmith@examiner.comBay Area NewsLocal

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