Developer appeals city requirements on project

SAN BRUNO — A dispute with city officials over traffic and parking measures has stalled a major housing development on the site of a former school.

The Planning Commission approved the project at the former Carl Sandburg School site last month, which includes 70 single-family homes and a park with conditions including providing parking on both sides of the streets within the project and constructing a secondary vehicle exit and entrance. The changes were made after dozens of Evergreen residents expressed concern about a potential parking shortage and cut-through traffic in the area.

However, developer SummerHill Homes informed the city Sept. 26 that it is appealing the conditions of approval to the City Council, saying that the second entrance would instead drop traffic into South San Francisco, which borders the project on three sides, planning manager Aaron Aknin said.

The second entrance was initially only for emergency vehicles, but the commission said the project needed more than one for the general public. The developer, citing a city traffic study, disagrees, saying that a secondary entrance is not needed to handle the expected amount of traffic coming in and out of the project.

One Evergreen resident, Maria Jacobs, joined several neighbors who feared that the project would cause an overflow of cars that would spill onto Evergreen, Maywood and Sherwood Drives. South San Francisco planning officials, however, have said that they would not support access into the project on the other side from Albright Way, a South San Francisco street.

The letter also said that the addedparking requirement would, among other reasons, reduce lots sizes and increase the number of trees that would need to be removed.

Successful appeals on projects to the City Council this large have been few and far between, Aknin said. Appellate parties in recent memory have been successful on residential expansions, for example, Aknin said.

The San Bruno Park School District approved the $30 million sale of the 10.3-acre property in 2005. Since the school closed in 1979, the property nestled in a residential area has been used as a private school and child care facility. It still houses the original single-story school buildings, a playground and two baseball diamonds.

The council was originally set to review the project at its regular meeting tonight, but because of the appeal, the issue will instead be reviewed at a Nov. 28 meeting.

tramroop@examiner.comBay Area NewsLocal

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