Despite soda ban, supervisor wants his Diet Cokes at City Hall

Mayor Gavin Newsom’s directive to cease the sale of sugary sodas on city properties like City Hall has some supervisors unhappy about what that could mean for their drinking habits.

As the Board of Supervisors Budget and Finance Committee were voting Wednesday on a lease for a new food operator to take over the café located on the ground floor of City Hall and in the first floor North Light Court, Supervisor Sean Elsbernd was concerned about what Newsom’s restrictions on sugary sodas could mean for him.

“In the past, and I’m not sure if it was executive orders or a press release on what the mayor [Gavin Newsom] has talked about mandates about no soda machines, things like that,” Elsbernd said. “Are there going to be restrictions on what this vendor is able to sell and what they are not able to sell?”

“Yes, consistent with executive directive relative to the healthy foods initiative,” Real Estate Division Assistant Director John Updike said.

Upon hearing about the restrictions, Elsbernd didn’t mince words.

“Will Supervisor [David] Campos and I still be able to get our Diet Cokes downstairs? That’s the question.”

“Yes you will. Diet Cokes, yes,” Updike said. Apparently diet sodas are not off limits just yet, just their more sugary counterparts.

“That’s so much healthier,” Supervisor Ross Mirkarimi joked.

“I like the sound of Diet Cokes opening in the board chambers, actually,” Avalos said.

The lease was unanimously approved.

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

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