Dense fog in Bay Area delays flights at regional airports

Residents of the Bay Area awoke to heavy fog Monday morning that made the commute dangerous for drivers across the region and delayed flight at local airports.

The National Weather Service issued a dense fog advisory for the San Francisco Bay Area.

Visibility was recorded at less than a quarter-mile, with near-zero visibility at times, according to the weather service.

The fog caused at least five flights to be canceled and several more to be delayed at San Jose International Airport Monday morning, an airport duty manager said.

Five Southwest Airlines flights have been canceled, and there are delays of up to 90 minutes, the duty manager said.

San Francisco International Airport is also facing a major slowdown because of the fog, with delays of about an hour for some flights, San Francisco International Airport duty manager Dan D'Innocenti said. No flights had been canceled at SFO as of mid-morning, and there were no delays at Oakland International Airport.

Drivers were advised to slow down, use headlights and leave plenty of distance between cars, weather officials said. The California Highway Patrol also warned about foggy conditions on Bay Area bridges and highways.

Fog advisories were put into place for the Bay, Carquinez and Benicia-Martinez bridges. An alert was  issued for the Dumbarton Bridge, as well. Other roadways that had advisories included a section of northbound Interstate Highway 280 around Edgewood Road near Redwood City,state Highway 84 in both directions at the Dumbarton Bridge near Newark and northbound U.S. Highway 101 at Ellis Street near Mountain View, according to the CHP.

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