Erica Marquez/S.F. Examiner file photoRashawn Williams

Decision pending on whether juvenile will be tried as adult in SF homicide

Whether the 14-year-old defendant in the Rashawn Williams homicide case will be tried as an adult remains to be seen, as the San Francisco court and both legal teams continue to review details of the case.

In juvenile court Wednesday morning, a tentative date of Jan. 15 was set for the hearing to decide if the defendant will be tried as an adult or a minor.

“There's still information coming in,” Deputy Public Defender Gregory Feldman told the court about the pile of discovery he is still reviewing for his client's case.

His client, who is not being identified because of his age, sat quietly in court with his small frame facing the judge.

The presiding judge in the Juvenile Justice Center courtroom Wednesday, Suzanne Ramos Bolanos, told the defendant, who remains in custody, to keep doing his school work and to focus on his classes. She then addressed his family.

“Thank you for being here to support your son,” said Ramos Bolanos to the defendant's mother, father and grandmother, who all sat behind him in the small courtroom not far from the family of Williams.

One piece of the discovery talked about by Feldman, a transcript of the computer-aided dispatch from the Sept. 2 incident, was handed over to the defense Wednesday by David Mitchel, the prosecutor in the case.

The incident occurred about 6:50 p.m. in front of a corner store in the 2900 block of Folsom Street. Williams and a family member were inside the store. When they left the store, Williams was allegedly stabbed by the defendant, a former middle school classmate of Williams.

The District Attorney's Office could have charged the defendant as an adult or a juvenile but instead put that decision into the hands of the court, which will now hold what is called a 707 hearing. That hearing, tentatively scheduled for Jan. 15, will decide if the case will be tried in adult or juvenile court.

That decision will impact the severity of the sentence if the defendant is found guilty.

Juveniles who are 13 or younger when a crime is committed cannot be tried as adults.

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