Decision is unlikely to sway other states

“As goes California, so goes the nation,” Mayor Gavin Newsom said to hundreds inside City Hall celebrating after the state’s highest court overturned the ban on gay marriage.

While California is often a trendsetter, Thursday’s ruling has little legal authority in other states.

George Washington University constitutional law professor JonathanTurley said that although the decision wouldn’t likely “cross state lines,” he expects the decision to rekindle the debate on a federal constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriages. He said it may also embolden some to file similar lawsuits in other states.

“Today’s decision is going to create a firestorm both legally and politically in the country,” Turley said.

University of Michigan law professor Doug Laycock said he didn’t think the legal ruling would have much influence on other state courts.

Thursday’s ruling makes California the second state in the nation to permit same-sex marriage, following Massachusetts.

There are 26 states where voters have already approved constitutional amendments banning same-sex marriage.

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticsLocalPolitics

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Supes approve $13.6B city budget in a 10-1 vote

Supervisor Stefani calls proposal ‘fiscally irresponsible’ in lone ‘nay’ vote

Filipino immersion proposal meets with resistance from school district

Bessie Carmichael parents say current program failing to teach language proficiency

Full lineup of Hardly Strictly Bluegrass announced

20th anniversary roots music festival streams on Oct. 3

Campos to serve as chief of staff for DA Boudin

Former Supervisor David Campos, a staunch progressive who leads the local Democratic… Continue reading

Most Read