Deals for furlough days, cuts will save city more than $2M

San Francisco’s city attorneys have agreed to take five unpaid days each year for the next two years, and apprenticeship and training programs will be cut from city gardeners, custodians and other craftsmen, under deals struck to help The City pay down its projected budget deficit of $338 million.

The two labor unions representing the city employees are the latest to agree to such cuts.

Mayor Gavin Newsom sent a letter in April to labor unions asking them to renegotiate their contracts and agree to cost reductions of up to 3 percent, advising them on a number of options such as mandatory unpaid days off.

The Municipal Attorneys Association agreed toa tentative deal requiring city attorneys to take a five unpaid furlough days during each of the following two fiscal years, which would save $1.4 million per year, according to the Mayor’s Office.

Laborers 261, which represents city gardeners, custodians and craftsmen, among others, agreed to cut apprenticeship and training programs, according to the Mayor’s Office. The deal would save The City $1 million during the next fiscal year, which begins July 1.

Last week, the 900-member Municipal Executives’ Association, representing city employees in a management position, agreed to take five mandatory unpaid furlough days during each of the next two years. That agreement is expected to save The City $4 million next year.

If the 12,562 employees — including police and fire personnel — who are paid through The City’s general fund took four days off next year, The City could save as much as much as $26.5 million, according to the City Controller’s Office.

“Labor has stepped up,” Newsom spokeswoman Giselle Barry said. “They’ve shown to be good partners, especially the laborers, who are our lowest-wage workers in The City.”

The mayor is still engaged in negotiations with other unions, she said.

dsmith@sfexaminer.com

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