Daly delivers a chorus of F-bombs

For whatever reason, Supervisor Chris Daly’s behavior often earns him more press attention than the significant political achievements he accomplishes, often against the odds. And so it was on Tuesday during the Board of Supervisors meeting when Daly said half a dozen times “f— you” and perhaps once “f—— a——-.”

The “f— yous” were personally addressed at different moments to some of his colleagues on the board soon after they voted to limit his opportunity to speak on a specific item. It wasn’t picked up on the microphones and probably no one in the public audience heard him.

And then while police Chief George Gascon was testifying at the podium in board chambers to the Board of Supervisors about controversial legislation, Daly stood up from his seat, walked over near the podium, interrupting the chief’s testimony, and introduced himself. Gascon said something like “always good to meet new people” as Daly walked out muttering to himself — he does not say it was directed specifically at Gascon — something like “f—— a——-” as he went out the door.

Daly said later on that day that Gascon has never bothered to call him, or talk to him since he became police chief, even though one of Gascon’s first big moves was a well-publicized crackdown of drug activity in the Tenderloin, which is in the district Daly represents.

Just Posted

Mission entrepreneurs threatened with displacement may win a reprieve

Planning Commission approves 10-year exception to use restrictions for Activspace building tenants

Police chief acknowledges raid on journalist’s home may have violated state laws

Admission marks major turnaround for department after outrage over First Amendment violation

Two people taken to the hospital after South of Market shooting

Suspect fled the area and remains at large

SF explores banning right turns at red lights

Turning right on red in San Francisco may soon be a thing… Continue reading

Deal reached to fund Free City College, withdraw ballot measure

City to provide $15 million annually for 10 years toward tuition subsidy program for SF residents

Most Read