Daly City BART to see retail revolution

This year may be one of change for Daly City BART station, a windy transit hub that will soon feature 1,200 feet of retail space to house a coffee shop and a convenience store.

The new stores are part of a deal brokered late in 2007 among BART, Peet’s Coffee & Tea, and a developer, Metropolitan Coffee & Concession, that will bring concession stands to eight BART stations, including Pittsburg/Bay Point and other East Bay stations.

The Daly City station was supposed to get its concession stand four years ago, buta complicated dispute between a former concessionaire and a contractor at Pittsburg/Bay Point station put a halt to the project, BART spokesman Linton Johnson said.

“It was a very complicated ordeal that arose out of complications due to a kiosk that was supposed to have been constructed, but the concessionaire allegedly defaulted on the contractor’s payment,” he said. “That impacted us because we were left holding the bags.”

For Daly City BART’s passengers, the broken contract meant years of living with a green fence that blocked off a portion of the sidewalk next to the station, collecting trash.

San Francisco resident and coffee drinker Franklin McLaughlin, who often travels to Daly City, said he was excited to hear Peet’s Coffee & Tea may soon move in.

“I can’t wait,” he said, while buying a BART ticket at the station. But not everyone is happy about the newcomer. Jimmy Ebadi, who says he’s been operating a small kiosk with coffee and hot dogs for almost 20 years, said he was angry BART chose another concessionaire over him.

Some are also concerned about what the new stores will do to BART’s rule of no food or drinks on the trains.

“It’d be nice to get a cup of coffee, but I don’t think it’s a good idea because it would probably make a bigger mess on the station,” said Daly City resident Jorge Trinidad, who lives close to the BART station.

Construction of the stores will begin as soon as BART finishes seismic retrofit work on a column adjacent to the site, which should take several months, according to Molly MacArthur, capital projects spokeswoman for BART.

svasilyuk@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Chelsea Hung, who owns Washington Bakery and Restaurant in Chinatown with her mother, said the restaurant is only making about 30 percent of pre-pandemic revenues. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Chinatown’s slow recovery has business owners fearing for the future

Lack of outside visitors threatens to push neighborhood into ‘downward spiral’

San Francisco Symphony Music Director Esa-Pekka Salonen and members of the orchestra were thrilled to be back inside Davies Symphony Hall on May 6 in a program for first responders featuring string works by Jean Sibelius, George Walker, Carl Nielsen, Caroline Shaw and Edward Grieg. (Courtesy Stefan Cohen/San Francisco Symphony)
SF Symphony makes joyful return to Davies Hall

Esa-Pekka Salonen conducts program for first responders and community leaders

Students in an after-school community hub move quickly through a social circle as they play a game at the Mission YMCA on Friday, May 7, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Parents scramble for ‘Summer Together’ spaces

City program offering free camps sees high demand, confusion over enrollment

Jazz pianist and composer Jon Jang is an instructor at Community Music Center in the Mission District. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Jon Jang composes bittersweet symphonies

Musician-activist’s works are steeped in civil rights history

Keith Doran, left, and the author celebrate a short but successful outing on El Capitan. (Courtesy photo)
Climb on: 50 lessons in 50 years, part 3

Series offers tips for adventurers seeking fulfillment outdoors

Most Read