Convicted ‘wedding planner’ who failed to provide services surrenders to authorities

Courtesy of the District Attorney's OfficeStanley Kwan

Courtesy of the District Attorney's OfficeStanley Kwan

A man surrendered to authorities Wednesday after pleading no contest in April to four counts of grand theft in connection with his wedding planning business that failed to provide services clients paid for, according to the District Attorney’s Office.

Stanley Kwan, 45, of San Francisco owned a wedding planning business called To Have and To Hold, which operated out of Chinatown in the early to mid-2000s, according to court records. In 2005-06, Kwan took money for services he did not provide.

Kwan was originally charged with 25 counts of grand theft and one count of conspiracy, and there are 33 victims named in the complaint. Some of the victims were vendors who were not paid.

An arrest warrant was issued for Kwan in 2009, but he was not located until July 2012 when he was arrested by Hayward police.

On April 22, Kwan pleaded no contest to four counts of grand theft in exchange for a four-year prison sentence, with two years served in prison and two years of supervised release, according to the District Attorney’s Office.

Kwan turned himself in Wednesday to begin his sentence.

The total loss to the victims was more than $60,000, according to court records.

Kwan has paid $7,000 of restitution so far and is liable for the remainder.

The services Kwan was paid to supply ranged from photography, bridal dresses, tuxedos, alcohol, flowers and limousine services.

In many instances, the victims were unaware there was any problem until the day of their wedding.

District Attorney George Gascón said he was disturbed by Kwan’s actions.

“I feel awful for these victims, many of whom discovered that they’d been ripped off just before their special day,” he said.Bay Area NewsCrimeCrime & CourtsSan Francisco District Attorney's OfficeStanley KwanTo Have and To Hold

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