Controversial Pacifica condo project up for a vote

The Prospects condominium project — which has been lauded for its environmentally “green” practices but slammed for blocking choice views of the Pacific Ocean — comes back tonight for a third shot at earning an OK from the city.

The Prospects, which is expected to include 34 condominium units at 801 Fassler Ave., came before the Planning Commission in April for a review of its environmental impact report. The 11.2-acre site is empty and overlooks Rockaway Quarry and the ocean less than half a mile away.

The project, which would take up less than half of the lot, would create its own energy using photovoltaic panels and includes a system that would allow the development to capture rainwater for landscaping use in the summer, developer Rick Lee said. It also will include energy-efficient appliances in all the units, according to Lee, who heads Pacifica-based Home Pride Construction Inc.

But, because of the project’s proximity to the ocean and to the quarry, there has been some criticism of the project’s size and obtrusiveness for nearby residents. Among the criticisms were that the project would erase valuable open space, contribute to more traffic on Highway 1 and block views of the nearby Pacific Ocean, city planner Michael Crabtree said.

Commission members including Christopher Ranken said traffic was the biggest issue that needed to be resolved. Now, Lee says he has compromised by reducing the project density, among other changes.

The project has been reduced from 34 to 29 units. In addition to the five units that were removed, three have been relocated so they don’t obstruct views of the ocean and nearby quarry.

The meeting starts at 7 p.m. tonight in Council Chambers, 2212 Beach Blvd.

tramroop@examiner.com

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