Construction, ramp closure set to begin Jan. 10 along Doyle Drive

The first long-term ramp closure of the $1 billion Doyle Drive reconstruction project south of the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco begins Jan. 10.

The off-ramp from northbound Doyle Drive to southbound Park Presidio, which drivers use to go from the Presidio and the Marina district south through the city, will remain closed until 2013.

The closure will not affect traffic continuing onto the bridge, but drivers who miss the official detour to Lombard Street will be directed to take the last exit before the bridge for alternate routes south.

The project, which is estimated for completion in 2014, will replace the 73-year-old, 1.5-mile stretch of Doyle Drive, which engineers have deemed structurally unsound in the event of a major earthquake. The new roadway will be called the Presidio Parkway.

Doyle Drive carries more than 100,000 vehicles to and from the Golden Gate Bridge each weekday.

This first major construction project, a $48 million contract awarded to the firm C.C. Myers, will close the ramp to southbound Park Presidio, also known as state Highway 1, for almost the duration of the entire rebuild.

A second ramp closure, from the northbound Park Presidio/Highway 1 to southbound Doyle Drive, will close from early 2010 until 2011. An exact closure date has not yet been set.

Bay Area NewsDoyleLocalPresidio

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