A supportive housing project is planned at this site in Mission Bay next to Police Headquarters. (Steven Ho/2017 Special to S.F. Examiner)

A supportive housing project is planned at this site in Mission Bay next to Police Headquarters. (Steven Ho/2017 Special to S.F. Examiner)

Construction begins on 140-unit Mission Bay building for the formerly homeless

San Francisco has begun building a 140-unit housing complex in Mission Bay for the formerly homeless, Mayor London Breed announced Tuesday.

In the planning stages since 2017, the $86.7 million Mission Bay Block 9 development is expected to finish construction in late 2021.

The site, at 410 China Basin St., is located next to Police Headquarters on Third Street.

Breed praised the project in a statement, emphasizing how important it is for The City to increase its supply of permanent supportive housing, which provides residences and services for the formerly homeless.

Such a project “not only create new homes for formerly homeless residents, but also creates new construction jobs to help get our economy back on track,” Breeds said.

The project was previously approved by the Commission on Community Investment and Infrastructure, which oversees the former redevelopment area known as Mission Bay.

Supervisor Matt Haney, who represents the area, said in a statement that the development is “going to enrich our Mission Bay community.”

The development is being undertaken by BRIDGE Housing, Community Housing Partnership and HealthRight 360. It incorporates factory built modular housing to lower costs and expedite the construction timeline.

While this project was in the planning stage well before COVID-19, officials said the pandemic further emphasized the need for it and others like it.

“Right now, it’s more important than ever for our most vulnerable neighbors to have a stable, affordable place to live,” said Cynthia Parker, president and CEO of BRIDGE Housing, in a statement. “We’re excited to see the building rise quickly with modular construction, and we’re proud to partner on these new apartments that will end homelessness for many San Franciscans.”

Once completed, the Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing will place formerly homeless residents into the units using its Coordinated Entry System, which prioritizes housing for persons based on certain criteria.

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsHousing and Homelessnesssan francisco news

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