Conjoined twins healthy, released from hospital

Formerly conjoined twins Yurelia and Fiorella Rocha-Arias have been released from Lucile Packard Children's Hospital and are in good shape following their separation and follow-up visits, according to the hospital.

“The twins are doing very well,'' said Gary Hartman, MD, lead surgeon for the separation surgery. “Yurelia is almost fully recovered.

Meanwhile, Fiorella's blood pressure is returning to normal through medication. All in all, we're quite pleased.''

The Costa Rican twins, who were joined at the abdomen and chest, were successfully separated during a nine-hour surgery at the hospital on Nov. 12.

Following their release from the hospital Dec. 11 the twins will still be outpatients at the hospital and remain in Palo Alto for follow-up visits before going home, according to the hospital.

“We expect another six to eight weeks of follow-up prior to going home,'' Hartman said. “Mom Maria Elizabeth Arias and dad Jose Luis are thrilled with the girls' progress.''

Fiorella and Yurelia will now have daily physical therapy sessions to help them build strength and mobility. They will also have cardiovascular check ups every other week,according to the hospital.

The Costa Rican twins not only were recovering from the separation but from follow-up surgeries. Yurelia was suffering from a serious congenital heart condition, which was surgically corrected on Nov. 14 and Fiorella had chest reconstruction and skin closure work Nov. 19.

The girls' father has returned to Costa Rica to continue taking care of the couple's other nine children while their mother remains in Palo Alto, according to hospital spokesman Todd Kleinheinz.

— Bay City News

Bay Area NewsLocal

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